rhel 8

Migrating C and C++ applications from Red Hat Enterprise Linux version 7 to version 8

Migrating C and C++ applications from Red Hat Enterprise Linux version 7 to version 8

When moving an application that you’ve compiled on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7 to RHEL 8, you will likely encounter issues due to changes in the application binary interface (ABI). The ABI describes the low-level binary interface between an application and its operating environment. This interface requires tools such as compilers and linkers, as well as the produced runtime libraries and the operating system itself, to agree upon the following:

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Rootless containers with Podman: The basics

Rootless containers with Podman: The basics

As a developer, you have probably heard a lot about containers. A container is a unit of software that provides a packaging mechanism that abstracts the code and all of its dependencies to make application builds fast and reliable. An easy way to experiment with containers is with the Pod Manager tool (Podman), which is a daemonless, open source, Linux-native tool that provides a command-line interface (CLI) similar to the docker container engine.

In this article, I will explain the benefits of using containers and Podman, introduce rootless containers and why they are important, and then show you how to use rootless containers with Podman with an example. Before we dive into the implementation, let’s review the basics.

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New C++ features in GCC 10

New C++ features in GCC 10

The GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) 10.1 was released in May 2020. Like every other GCC release, this version brought many additions, improvements, bug fixes, and new features. Fedora 32 already ships GCC 10 as the system compiler, but it’s also possible to try GCC 10 on other platforms (see godbolt.org, for example). Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) users will get GCC 10 in the Red Hat Developer Toolset (RHEL 7), or the Red Hat GCC Toolset (RHEL 8).

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Multipath TCP on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.3: From 0 to 1 subflows

Multipath TCP on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.3: From 0 to 1 subflows

Multipath TCP (MPTCP) extends traditional TCP to allow reliable end-to-end delivery over multiple simultaneous TCP paths, and is coming as a tech preview on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.3. This is the first of two articles for users who want to practice with the new MPTCP functionality on a live system. In this first part, we show you how to enable the protocol in the kernel and let client and server applications use the MPTCP sockets. Then, we run diagnostics on the kernel in a sample test network, where endpoints are using a single subflow.

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iptables: The two variants and their relationship with nftables

iptables: The two variants and their relationship with nftables

In Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8, the userspace utility program iptables has a close relationship to its successor, nftables. The association between the two utilities is subtle, which has led to confusion among Linux users and developers. In this article, I attempt to clarify the relationship between the two variants of iptables and its successor program, nftables.

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Using Ansible to automate Google Cloud Platform

Using Ansible to automate Google Cloud Platform

In this article, you will learn how to seamlessly automate the provisioning of Google Cloud Platform (GCP) resources using the new Red Hat Ansible modules and your Red Hat Ansible Tower credentials.

About the new GCP modules

Starting with Ansible 2.6, Red Hat has partnered with Google to ship a new set of modules for automating Google Cloud Platform resource management. The partnership has resulted in more than 100 GCP modules and a consistent naming scheme of gcp_*. While we still have access to the original modules, developers are recommended to use the newer modules whenever possible.

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