Using Red Hat Data Grid to power a multi-cloud real-time game

The scavenger hunt game developed for the audience to play during the Red Hat Summit 2018 demo used Red Hat Data Grid as storage for everything except the pictures taken by the participants. Data was stored across three different cloud environments using cross-site replication. In this blog post, we will look at how data was flowing through Data Grid and explain the Data Grid features powering different aspects of the game’s functionality.

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Red Hat Data Grid on Three Clouds (the details behind the demo)

If you saw or heard about the multi-cloud demo at Red Hat Summit 2018, this article details how we ran Red Hat Data Grid in active-active-active mode across three cloud providers. This set up enabled us to show a fail over between cloud providers in real time with no loss of data. In addition to Red Hat Data Grid, we used Vert.x (reactive programming), OpenWhisk (serverless), and Red Hat Gluster Storage (software-defined storage.)

This year’s Red Hat Summit was quite an adventure for all of us. A trip to San Francisco is probably on the bucket list of IT geeks from all over the world. Also, we were able to meet many other Red Hatters, who work remotely for Red Hat as we do.  However, the best part was that we had something important to say: “we believe in the hybrid/multi cloud” and we got to prove that live on stage.

Photo credit: Bolesław Dawidowicz

 

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Red Hat Summit signage: Keep Exploring

Red Hat Summit: Lowering the risk of monolith to microservices

Christian Posta, Chief Architect at Red Hat, presented the story of a fictitious company1 moving a monolithic application to microservices.

When considering risk, we think we know the bad things that can happen and the probabilities of those bad things actually happening. Christian defines a monolith as a large application developed over many years by different teams that delivers proven business value while being very difficult to update and maintain. Its architecture, elegant at one point, has eroded over time. That makes it difficult to assess the risk of migrating a monolith.

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Red Hat Summit signage at Moscone South

Red Hat Summit: An Eventful Tour from Enterprise Integration to Serverless

Red Hat Senior Architects Marius Bogoevici and Christian Posta recently presented an overview of event-driven architecture, taking the audience from the basics of enterprise integration to microservices and serverless computing. Standing in front of a packed room at Red Hat Summit, their talk addressed four basic points:

  1. Event-driven architectures have been around for a while. What are they, why are they powerful, and why are back en vogue?
  2. Messaging is often used as a backbone for event-based distributed systems. What options do we have for cloud-native event-driven architectures?
  3. Integration is necessary for any organization. How do streaming, cloud-native architectures, and microservices fit in?
  4. Are Functions-as-a-Service (FaaS) the next utopian architecture? Where do functions fit in a world of microservices?

The entire session was done with three enterprise concerns in mind. First is the divide between agile systems and purpose-built systems. While the purpose-built system is optimized for a small set of use cases, it is very difficult to change if new use cases arise or the old use cases become irrelevant. We have to be agile to adapt to a constantly changing environment. Another concern is resource utilization. We want to eliminate waste and get the most out of our systems and resources, although the cloud in general and containers in particular make more distributed architectures practical. Finally, Christian made the observation that we cannot build complex systems from complex parts. The components we develop must be as simple and understandable as possible.

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Signage for the Red Hat Summit at Moscone West in San Francisco

Red Hat Summit: Functions as a Service with OpenWhisk and OpenShift

Serverless computing (often called Functions-as-a-Service, or FaaS) is one of the hottest emerging technologies today. The OpenWhisk project, currently in incubation at Apache, is an open-source implementation of FaaS that lets you create functions that are invoked in response to events. Our own Brendan McAdams gave a presentation and demo that explained the basics of serverless, how the OpenWhisk project works, and how to run OpenWhisk in OpenShift.

Brendan outlined the three properties of a serverless / FaaS platform:

  1. It responds to events by invoking functions
  2. Functions are loaded and executed on demand
  3. Functions can be chained together with triggered events from outside the FaaS platform itself.

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Watch over 100 Red Hat Summit 2018 session videos online

Over 100 breakout sessions from Red Hat Summit 2018 are now available to watch on YouTube. Even if you were at Summit, there were too many sessions to attend all of the ones you might have wanted to see. All of the recorded sessions are in one big searchable YouTube playlist. Over 100 recorded breakout sessions for 2018 is a big improvement over the 54 session videos available for Red Hat Summit 2017.

Update: Many of the presentation slide decks are now available in a searchable archive.

In the next few weeks, a number of the developer sessions will be highlighted on this blog by topic.

To get a development-oriented overview of what happened at Red Hat Summit, watch these TheCube.net interviews with:

All interviews are embedded below.

Resources:

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A Red Hat Summit sign on the streets of San Francisco

Red Hat Summit: An introduction to OpenShift.io

Red Hat OpenShift.io is an innovative online service for development teams. Installing and configuring IDEs, libraries, and various tools is a major time sink. OpenShift.io is a cloud-native set of zero-install tools for editing and debugging code, agile planning, and managing CI/CD pipelines. It also features package analytics (an unbelievably cool feature we’ll discuss more in a minute), and has various quick starts for common frameworks. Because everyone on the team uses the exact same tools, “It works on my machine” becomes a thing of the past.

Product Manager Todd Mancini started the session with a brief overview of the product. There’s so much more here than just the ability to develop code online. Today’s best practices include complex deployment pipelines. With OpenShift.io, you get a Maven repository and a Jenkins pipeline automatically. You can select from several pipeline templates. If you need an approval stage, for example, that’s built in to the product. In short, all the tools you need to create a virtuous circle of analyze, plan, and create are here, with no installation or configuration needed.

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Red Hat Summit 2018 Burr Sutter Demo – Multi-cloud

One of the highlights of Red Hat Summit 2018 was another live, on-stage demo given by Burr Sutter (@burrsutter) and a team of developers. The demo was particularly engaging because the audience participated using a mobile game on their phones that communicated with a multi-cloud backend developed by Burr’s team. The objective of the demo was to show off the technologies, and also show how complex development and deployment challenges can be solved with a modern approach.

Audience members were challenged to take pictures of requested objects as part of the game. Points were assigned for how well the photo represented the request. The photos were automatically uploaded to the cloud where a TensorFlow image recognition service running on OpenShift scored each photo using machine learning. (The video is available after the break.)

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Street Signs for the Red Hat Summit

Red Hat Summit: Clouds today, serverless tomorrow

Have you ever thought to yourself, “Today’s world would be so much richer if we had 29 kinds of hummus?” Neither has Stephanos Bacon, Senior Director of Portfolio Strategy for Red Hat Application Platforms. His entertaining presentation moved from the options available to humans hungry for hummus to a discussion of the bewildering array of choices available to developers and architects. Although too many choices can be a bad thing1, it’s important to understand what choices are relevant today and that the relevance of those choices is always shifting.

There are several things that don’t change, however. Some of the concerns that have been with us since before the dawn of time2 include:

  • Making developers as productive as possible
  • Balancing productivity with governance and compliance
  • Delivering software predictably and in a timely manner
  • Making software as robust as possible
  • Prioritizing usability and accessibility

But beyond these goals, there are three factors that are always in flux:

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Moscone West graced with the Shadowman logo

Red Hat Summit: Containers, Microservices, and Serverless Computing

You’re in an IT department. How does the rest of the organization see you? As a valuable asset whose code and APIs make a difference in the marketplace, or as a necessary evil that should be trimmed as much as possible? Containers, microservices, and serverless computing can make you more responsive, flexible, and competitive, which in turn makes your organization more effective. And that puts you solidly in the asset column.

After sprinting through the streets of San Francisco from the stage of the opening keynote at Red Hat Summit 2018 (replay available here), Burr Sutter hosted a packed house in Moscone South to talk about these technologies. Containers are widely accepted (see the announcement from Red Hat and Microsoft for an example), microservices are increasingly popular as an approach to modernizing monolithic applications, and serverless computing is emerging as an important new programming model.

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