Red Hat SSO

Transitioning Red Hat SSO to a highly-available hybrid cloud deployment

Transitioning Red Hat SSO to a highly-available hybrid cloud deployment

About two years ago, Red Hat IT finished migrating our customer-facing authentication system to Red Hat Single Sign-On (Red Hat SSO). As a result, we were quite pleased with the performance and flexibility of the new platform. Due to some architectural decisions that were made in order to optimize for uptime using the technologies at our disposal, we were unable to take full advantage of Red Hat SSO’s robust feature set until now. This article describes how we’re now addressing database and session replication between global sites.

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Announcing Kubernetes-native self-service messaging with Red Hat AMQ Online

Announcing Kubernetes-native self-service messaging with Red Hat AMQ Online

Microservices architecture is taking over software development discussions everywhere. More and more companies are adapting to develop microservices as the core of their new systems. However, when going beyond the “microservices 101” googled tutorial, required services communications become more and more complex. Scalable, distributed systems, container-native microservices, and serverless functions benefit from decoupled communications to access other dependent services. Asynchronous (non-blocking) direct or brokered interaction is usually referred to as messaging.

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Red Hat Single Sign-On: Give it a try for no cost!

Red Hat Single Sign-On: Give it a try for no cost!

In a software world where each day is more hostile than the previous one, security matters and developers are coping with more and more non-functional requirements about security. The most common ones are the “OWASP Top 10”: the ten security risks that every developer should know. There are many more security risks you should care about, but those ten risks are the ones having the most impact on the security of your software. Among them are authentication and access control.

The good news is that authentication and access control are now commodities in the open source world, thanks to Red Hat Single Sign-On Red Hat Single Sign-On is an access management tool that takes care of the details of most authentication protocols such as SAML, OAuth, and OpenID Connect; user consent with UMA; and even access control. It is easy to use, is very well-documented, and has a very active community: Keycloak.

This article describes how to download and install Red Hat Single Sign-On for no cost.

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Using a public certificate with Red Hat Single Sign-On/Keycloak

Using a public certificate with Red Hat Single Sign-On/Keycloak

When deploying Red Hat Single Sign-On/Keycloak for a test or a proof of concept, most users will choose to use a self-signed certificate as explained in the official documentation.

The setup instructions are straightforward, but this self-signed certificate will trigger certificate error messages in your web browser and can also prevent some clients such as Postman from working properly.

This article explains how to use a public certificate from Let’s Encrypt with Red Hat Single Sign-On.

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3scale ActiveDocs and OAuth 2.0

3scale ActiveDocs and OAuth 2.0

This guide is designed to help you integrate your Red Hat Single Sign-On server with the OpenAPI (OAI)-based ActiveDocs in your 3scale developer portal. Although it has only been implemented with this particular Identity & Access Management solution (IAM), you could in theory make some customizations where necessary to integrate with another OpenID Connect-based solution.

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HOW-TO setup 3scale OpenID Connect (OIDC) Integration with RH SSO

HOW-TO setup 3scale OpenID Connect (OIDC) Integration with RH SSO

This step-by-step guide is a follow-up to the Red Hat 3scale API Management new 2.1 version announcement. As many of you will know, this new version simplifies the integration between APIcast gateway and Red Hat Single Sign-On through OpenID Connect (OIDC) for API authentication. As a result, now you can select OpenID Connect as your authentication mechanism besides API Key, App Key pair, and OAuth. Also, the on-premise version adds a new component that synchronizes the client creation on the Red Hat Single Sign-On domain.

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How Red Hat re-designed its Single Sign On (SSO) architecture, and why.

Red Hat, Inc. recently released the Red Hat SSO product, which is an enterprise application designed to provide federated authentication for web and mobile applications.

In the SAML world, RH SSO is known as an Identity Provider (IdP), meaning its role in life is to authenticate and authorize users for use in a federated identity management system. For example, it can be used to authenticate internal users against a corporate LDAP instance such that they can then access the corporate Google Docs domain.

Red Hat IT recently re-implemented our customer-facing authentication system, building the platform on Red Hat SSO. This system serves all Red Hat properties, including www.redhat.com and access.redhat.com — our previous IdP was a custom-built IdP using the JBoss EAP PicketLink framework.

While this worked for the original SAML use-case, our development teams were seeking an easier integration experience and support for OAuth and OpenID Connect protocols. Red Hat SSO comes out of the box with full SAML 2.0, OAuth 2.0 and OpenID Connect support.  Re-implementing the IdP from the ground-up gave us a chance to re-architect the solution, making the system much more performant and resilient.  While outages were never really acceptable in the past, our customers now expect 24/7 uptime.  This is especially true with Red Hat’s increased product suite, including hosted offerings such as OpenShift Online.

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