Red Hat OpenShift

Self-service messaging with Red Hat AMQ Online and GitOps

Self-service messaging with Red Hat AMQ Online and GitOps

This article explores the service model of Red Hat AMQ Online 1.1 and how it maps to a GitOps workflow for different teams in your organization. For more information on new features in AMQ Online 1.1, see the release notes.

AMQ Online is an operator of stateful messaging services running on Red Hat OpenShift. AMQ Online is built around the principle that the responsibility of operating the messaging service is separate from the tenants consuming it. The operations team in can manage the messaging infrastructure, while the development teams provision messaging in a self-service manner, just as if they were using a public cloud service.

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Get started with Jenkins CI/CD in Red Hat OpenShift 4

Get started with Jenkins CI/CD in Red Hat OpenShift 4

Automation is what we (developers) do. We automate ticket sales and automobiles and streaming music services and everything you can possibly tie into an analog-to-digital converter. But, have we taken the time to automate our processes?

In this article, I’ll show how to build an automated integration and continuous delivery pipeline using Jenkins CI/CD and Red Hat OpenShift 4. I will not dive into a lot of details—and there are a lot of details—but we’ll get a good overview. The details will be explained later in this series of blog posts.

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Automated migration from JBoss AMQ 6 to Red Hat AMQ 7 on Red Hat OpenShift

Automated migration from JBoss AMQ 6 to Red Hat AMQ 7 on Red Hat OpenShift

Since Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform was first released, Red Hat Middleware products were provided to deploy on it and help developers to build more complex solutions. Messaging Brokers are a very important piece in most new application architectures, such as microservices, event sourcing, and CQRS. Red Hat JBoss AMQ was provided from the beginning to deploy Messaging Brokers on Red Hat OpenShift easily.

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Optimizing Red Hat Fuse 7 Spring Boot container images

Optimizing Red Hat Fuse 7 Spring Boot container images

Working with Red Hat Fuse 7 on Spring Boot is straightforward. In my field experience, I have seen many development (a.k.a. integrator) teams moving to Fuse 7 on Spring Boot for their new integration platforms on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (well aligned with agile integration).

Lately, however, I have also seen some teams worried about the size of the final images and the deployment pipeline. In most cases, they had developed a set of common libraries or frameworks to extend or to homogenize the final integration projects. All the cases have the same result:

  • Several dependencies copied in each integration project
  • Always replacing the container images with the latest fat JAR (including the same dependencies) in each build pipeline

Spring Boot is usually packaged as “fat JARS” that contain all runtime dependencies. Although this is quite convenient, because you only need a JRE and a single JAR to run the application, in a container environment such as Red Hat OpenShift, you have to build a full container image to deploy your application.

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Build and deploy an API with Camel K on Red Hat OpenShift

Build and deploy an API with Camel K on Red Hat OpenShift

With the growing number of APIs and microservices, the time given to creating and integrating them has become shorter and shorter. That’s why we need an integration framework with tooling to quickly build an API and include capabilities for a full API life cycle. Camel K lets you build and deploy your API on Kubernetes or Red Hat OpenShift in less than a second. Unbelievable, isn’t it?

For those who are not familiar with it, Camel K is a subproject of Apache Camel with the target of building a lightweight runtime for running integration code directly on cloud platforms like Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift. It was inspired by serverless principles, and it will also target Knative shortly. The article by Nicola Ferraro will give you a good introduction.

In this article, I’ll show how to build an API with Camel K. For that, we will start first by designing our API using Apicurio Studio, which is based on the OpenAPI standard, and then we will provide the OpenAPI standard document to Camel K in order to implement the API and deploy it to Red Hat OpenShift.

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Red Hat OpenShift 4.0 Developer Preview on AWS: Up and running with Windows

Red Hat OpenShift 4.0 Developer Preview on AWS: Up and running with Windows

In a previous article, “OpenShift 4.0 Developer Preview on AWS is up and running” I included instructions for using macOS or Linux to install and manage your Red Hat OpenShift 4.0 cluster. Since I recently added a Windows 10 PC to my technology mix, I decided to try to use Windows as my only choice.

I was saddened to learn that the installer, openshift-install, isn’t available for Windows. But, like any developer who won’t be denied; I found a way.

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How to set up your first Kubernetes environment on Windows

How to set up your first Kubernetes environment on Windows

You’ve crushed the whole containers thing—it was much easier than you anticipated, and you’ve updated your resume. Now it’s time to move into the spotlight, walk the red carpet, and own the whole Kubernetes game. In this blog post, we’ll get our Kubernetes environment up and running on Windows 10, spin up an image in a container, and drop the mic on our way out the door—headed to Coderland.

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How to set up your first Kubernetes environment on macOS

How to set up your first Kubernetes environment on macOS

By following my previous article in this series, you’ve crushed the whole containers thing. It was much easier than you anticipated, and you’ve updated your resume. Now it’s time to move into the spotlight, walk the red carpet, and own the whole Kubernetes game. In this blog post, we’ll get our Kubernetes environment up and running on macOS, spin up an image in a container, and head to Coderland.

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5 Red Hat Summit sessions developers won’t want to miss

5 Red Hat Summit sessions developers won’t want to miss

Oh sure, like countless thousands of others you’re planning on attending Red Hat Summit in Boston this year. But you’re a little anxious that you might miss the best sessions at the show. In no particular order, here are five sessions (actually five sessions and a workshop) that will enrich your life, expand your horizons, and give you the knowledge you need to lead your team forward. Be sure to check them out.

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