Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform

How to run Kafka on Openshift, the enterprise Kubernetes, with AMQ Streams

How to run Kafka on Openshift, the enterprise Kubernetes, with AMQ Streams

On October 25th Red Hat announced the general availability of their AMQ Streams Kubernetes Operator for Apache Kafka. Red Hat AMQ Streams focuses on running Apache Kafka on Openshift providing a massively-scalable, distributed, and high performance data streaming platform. AMQ Streams, based on the Apache Kafka and Strimzi projects, offers a distributed backbone that allows microservices and other applications to share data with extremely high throughput. This backbone enables:

  • Publish and subscribe: Many to many dissemination in a fault tolerant, durable manner.
  • Replayable events: Serves as a repository for microservices to build in-memory copies of source data, up to any point in time.
  • Long-term data retention: Efficiently stores data for immediate access in a manner limited only by disk space.
  • Partition messages for more horizontal scalability: Allows for organizing messages to maximum concurrent access.

One of the most requested items from developers and architects is how to get started with a simple deployment option for testing purposes. In this guide we will use Red Hat Container Development Kit, based on minishift, to start an Apache Kafka cluster on Kubernetes.

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How to install Ansible Tower on Red Hat OpenShift

How to install Ansible Tower on Red Hat OpenShift

In this article, I will show how to install and manage Red Hat Ansible Tower on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform. Ansible Tower helps you scale IT automation, manage complex deployments, and improve productivity. You can centralize and control your IT infrastructure with a visual dashboard, and it provides role-based access control, job scheduling, integrated notifications, graphical inventory management, and more.

As you may know, Ansible Tower 3.3, the latest release of this automation platform, was released a few weeks ago and added new features. From the release notes you’ll see that Ansible Tower 3.3 added support for a container-based installation on top of OpenShift

In this blog, we’ll see how easy it is to set up Ansible Tower 3.3 on OpenShift and have it running as a container in just a few minutes.

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Announcing Red Hat Developer Studio 12.9.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.9.0.Final for Eclipse 2018-09

Announcing Red Hat Developer Studio 12.9.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.9.0.Final for Eclipse 2018-09

Attention desktop IDE users: Red Hat Developer Studio 12.9 and the community edition, JBoss Tools 4.9.0 for Eclipse 2018-09, are now available. You can download the Developer Studio bundled installer, which installs Eclipse 4.9 with all of the JBoss Tools already configured. Or, if you have an existing Eclipse 4.9 (2018-09) installation, you can download the JBoss Tools package.

This article highlights some of the new features in both JBoss Tools and Eclipse Photon, covering WildFly, Spring Boot, Camel, Maven, and many Java-related improvements—including full Java 11 support.

Developer Studio/JBoss Tools provides a desktop IDE with a broad set of tooling covering multiple programming models and frameworks. If you are doing container/cloud development, there is integrated functionality for working with Red Hat OpenShift, Kubernetes, Red Hat Container Development Kit, and Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes. For integration projects, there is tooling covering Camel and Red Hat Fuse that can be used in both local and cloud deployments.

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Natively compile Java code for better startup time

Natively compile Java code for better startup time

Microservices and serverless architectures are being implemented, or are a part of the roadmap, in most modern solution stacks. Given that Java is still the dominant language for business applications, the need for reducing the startup time for Java is becoming more important. Serverless architectures are one such area that needs faster startup times, and applications hosted on container platforms such as Red Hat Openshift can benefit from both fast Java startup time and a smaller Docker image size.

Let’s see how GraalVM can be beneficial for Java-based programs in terms of speed and size improvements. Surely, these gains are not bound to containers or serverless architectures and can be applied to a variety of use cases.

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Announcing Red Hat Developer Studio 12.0.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.6.0.Final for Eclipse Photon

Announcing Red Hat Developer Studio 12.0.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.6.0.Final for Eclipse Photon

Attention desktop IDE users: Red Hat Developer Studio 12.0 and the community edition, JBoss Tools 4.6.0 for Eclipse Photon, are now available. You can download a bundled installer, Developer Studio, which installs Eclipse 4.8 with all of the JBoss Tools already configured. Or, if you have an existing Eclipse 4.8 (Photon) installation, you can download the JBoss Tools package. This article highlights some of the new features in both JBoss Tools and Eclipse Photon, covering WildFly, Spring Boot, Camel, Maven, and many Java related improvements including full Java 10 support.

Developer Studio / JBoss Tools provides a desktop IDE with a broad set of tooling covering multiple programming models and frameworks. If you are doing container / cloud development, there is integrated functionality for working with Red Hat OpenShift, Kubernetes, Red Hat Container Development Kit, and Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes. For integration projects, there is tooling covering Camel and Red Hat Fuse that can be used in both local and cloud deployments.

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How to call the OpenShift REST API from C#

How to call the OpenShift REST API from C#

When you want to do automated tasks for builds and deployments with Red Hat OpenShift, you might want to take advantage of the OpenShift REST API. In scripts you can use oc CLI command which talks to the REST APIs. However there are times when it is more convenient to do this directly from your C# code without having to invoke an external program. This is the value of having an infrastructure platform that is exposed as services with an open API.

If you want to call the API from your C# code, you have to create a request object, call the API, and parse the response object. The upstream project, OpenShift Origin, provides a Swagger 2.0 specification and you can generate a client library for each programming language. Of course, C# is supported.  This isn’t a new approach, Kubernetes has a repository that is generated by Swagger Codegen.

For C#, we can use Microsoft Visual Studio to generate a C# client library for a REST API. In this article, I’ll walk you through the process of generating the library from the definition.

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Remotely Debug an ASP.NET Core Container Pod on OpenShift with Visual Studio

Remotely Debug an ASP.NET Core Container Pod on OpenShift with Visual Studio

Last year, I wrote a blog post how to remotely debug your ASP.NET Core container on OpenShift with Visual Studio Code. Today I introduce how to remotely debug a pod using Visual Studio from your Windows computer. Sometimes you encounter an issue that happens only in the production environment. Remotely debugging a pod enables you to investigate such an issue.

Visual Studio and Visual Studio Code now support SSH as a transport protocol for remote debugging. If a remote host accepts an SSH connection, Visual Studio can do remote debugging using Visual Studio’s default feature. However, you need to use the oc command instead of an SSH client such as putty since Red Hat OpenShift pods don’t allow direct connections via SSH. The MIEngine debugger enables you to use any command for SSH connection.

Note:
All the steps below have been confirmed using a combination of Visual Studio 2017 (versions 15.7.2 and 15.8 preview2) on Windows 10 and OpenShift 3.9.

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Eclipse Che 6.6 Release Notes

Eclipse Che 6.6 Release Notes

[This article is cross-posted from the Eclipse Che Blog.]

Eclipse Che 6.6 Release Notes

Eclipse Che 6.6 is here! Since the release of Che 6.0, the community has added a number of new capabilities:

  • Kubernetes support: Run Che on Kubernetes and deploy it using Helm.
  • Hot server updates: Upgrade Che with zero downtime.
  • C/C++ support: ClangD Language Server was added.
  • Camel LS support: Apache Camel Language Server Protocol (LSP) support was added.
  • <strong”>Eclipse Java Development Tools (JDT) Language Server (LS): Extended LS capabilities were added for Eclipse Che.
  • Faster workspace loading: Images are pulled in parallel with the new UI.

Quick Start

Che is a cloud IDE and containerized workspace server. You can get started with Che by using the following links:

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How to install Red Hat CDK 3.4 on Fedora 28

How to install Red Hat CDK 3.4 on Fedora 28

Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) provides a single-node Red Hat OpenShift cluster designed to assist with containerized application development. This environment is like a production OpenShift environment, but it is designed to work on a single user’s computer. For this purpose, CDK runs Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform in a virtual machine.

Follow these steps to install CDK 3.4 on Fedora 28:

  1. Set up the virtualization environment.
  2. Install and configure CDK.
  3. Start CDK.

Below are details for performing these steps.

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Using Ansible Galaxy Roles in Ansible Playbook Bundles

Using Ansible Galaxy Roles in Ansible Playbook Bundles

[In case you aren’t following the OpenShift blog, I’m cross posting my article here because I think it will be of interest to the Red Hat Developer commnity.]

The Open Service Broker API standard aims to standardize how services (cloud, third-party, on-premise, legacy, etc) are delivered to applications running on cloud platforms like OpenShift. This allows applications to consume services the exact same way no matter on which cloud platform they are deployed. The service broker pluggable architecture enables admins to add third-party brokers to the platform in order to make third-party and cloud services available to the application developers directly from the OpenShift service catalog. As an example AWS Service Broker created jointly by Amazon and Red Hat, Azure Service Broker created by Microsoft and Helm Service Broker created by Google to allow consumption of AWS services, Azure services and Helm charts on Kubernetes and OpenShift. Furthermore, admins can create their own brokers in order to make custom services like provisioning an Oracle database on their internal Oracle RAC available to the developers through the service catalog.

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