Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform

Integration of storage services (part 6)

Integration of storage services (part 6)

In Part 5 this series, we looked into details that determine how your integration becomes the key to transforming your customer experience.

It started with laying out the process of how I’ve approached the use case by researching successful customer portfolio solutions as the basis for a generic architectural blueprint. Now it’s time to cover various blueprint details.

This article covers the final elements in the blueprint, storage services, which are fundamental to the generic architectural overview.

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Using a local NuGet server with Red Hat OpenShift

Using a local NuGet server with Red Hat OpenShift

NuGet is the .NET package manager. By default, the .NET Core SDK will use packages from the nuget.org website.

In this article, you’ll learn how to deploy a NuGet server on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (RHOCP). We’ll use it as a caching server and see that it speeds up our builds. Before we get to that, we’ll explore some general NuGet concepts and see why it makes sense to use a local NuGet server.

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Integration of container platform essentials (Part 5)

Integration of container platform essentials (Part 5)

In Part 4 of this series, we looked into details that determine how your integration becomes the key to transforming your omnichannel customer experience.

It started with laying out the process of how I’ve approached the use case by researching successful customer portfolio solutions as the basis for a generic architectural blueprint. Now it’s time to cover more blueprint details.

This article discusses the core elements in the blueprint (container platform and microservices) that are crucial to the generic architectural overview.

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Building .NET Core container images using S2I

Building .NET Core container images using S2I

Red Hat OpenShift implements .NET Core support via a source-to-image (S2I) builder. In this article, we’ll take a closer look at how you can use that builder directly. Using S2I, you can build .NET Core application images without having to write custom build scripts or Dockerfiles. This can be useful on your development machine or as part of a CI/CD pipeline.

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How to run Kafka on Openshift, the enterprise Kubernetes, with AMQ Streams

How to run Kafka on Openshift, the enterprise Kubernetes, with AMQ Streams

On October 25th Red Hat announced the general availability of their AMQ Streams Kubernetes Operator for Apache Kafka. Red Hat AMQ Streams focuses on running Apache Kafka on Openshift providing a massively-scalable, distributed, and high performance data streaming platform. AMQ Streams, based on the Apache Kafka and Strimzi projects, offers a distributed backbone that allows microservices and other applications to share data with extremely high throughput. This backbone enables:

  • Publish and subscribe: Many to many dissemination in a fault tolerant, durable manner.
  • Replayable events: Serves as a repository for microservices to build in-memory copies of source data, up to any point in time.
  • Long-term data retention: Efficiently stores data for immediate access in a manner limited only by disk space.
  • Partition messages for more horizontal scalability: Allows for organizing messages to maximum concurrent access.

One of the most requested items from developers and architects is how to get started with a simple deployment option for testing purposes. In this guide we will use Red Hat Container Development Kit, based on minishift, to start an Apache Kafka cluster on Kubernetes.

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How to install Ansible Tower on Red Hat OpenShift

How to install Ansible Tower on Red Hat OpenShift

In this article, I will show how to install and manage Red Hat Ansible Tower on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform. Ansible Tower helps you scale IT automation, manage complex deployments, and improve productivity. You can centralize and control your IT infrastructure with a visual dashboard, and it provides role-based access control, job scheduling, integrated notifications, graphical inventory management, and more.

As you may know, Ansible Tower 3.3, the latest release of this automation platform, was released a few weeks ago and added new features. From the release notes you’ll see that Ansible Tower 3.3 added support for a container-based installation on top of OpenShift

In this blog, we’ll see how easy it is to set up Ansible Tower 3.3 on OpenShift and have it running as a container in just a few minutes.

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Announcing Red Hat Developer Studio 12.9.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.9.0.Final for Eclipse 2018-09

Announcing Red Hat Developer Studio 12.9.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.9.0.Final for Eclipse 2018-09

Attention desktop IDE users: Red Hat Developer Studio 12.9 and the community edition, JBoss Tools 4.9.0 for Eclipse 2018-09, are now available. You can download the Developer Studio bundled installer, which installs Eclipse 4.9 with all of the JBoss Tools already configured. Or, if you have an existing Eclipse 4.9 (2018-09) installation, you can download the JBoss Tools package.

This article highlights some of the new features in both JBoss Tools and Eclipse Photon, covering WildFly, Spring Boot, Camel, Maven, and many Java-related improvements—including full Java 11 support.

Developer Studio/JBoss Tools provides a desktop IDE with a broad set of tooling covering multiple programming models and frameworks. If you are doing container/cloud development, there is integrated functionality for working with Red Hat OpenShift, Kubernetes, Red Hat Container Development Kit, and Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes. For integration projects, there is tooling covering Camel and Red Hat Fuse that can be used in both local and cloud deployments.

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Natively compile Java code for better startup time

Natively compile Java code for better startup time

Microservices and serverless architectures are being implemented, or are a part of the roadmap, in most modern solution stacks. Given that Java is still the dominant language for business applications, the need for reducing the startup time for Java is becoming more important. Serverless architectures are one such area that needs faster startup times, and applications hosted on container platforms such as Red Hat Openshift can benefit from both fast Java startup time and a smaller Docker image size.

Let’s see how GraalVM can be beneficial for Java-based programs in terms of speed and size improvements. Surely, these gains are not bound to containers or serverless architectures and can be applied to a variety of use cases.

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Announcing Red Hat Developer Studio 12.0.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.6.0.Final for Eclipse Photon

Announcing Red Hat Developer Studio 12.0.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.6.0.Final for Eclipse Photon

Attention desktop IDE users: Red Hat Developer Studio 12.0 and the community edition, JBoss Tools 4.6.0 for Eclipse Photon, are now available. You can download a bundled installer, Developer Studio, which installs Eclipse 4.8 with all of the JBoss Tools already configured. Or, if you have an existing Eclipse 4.8 (Photon) installation, you can download the JBoss Tools package. This article highlights some of the new features in both JBoss Tools and Eclipse Photon, covering WildFly, Spring Boot, Camel, Maven, and many Java related improvements including full Java 10 support.

Developer Studio / JBoss Tools provides a desktop IDE with a broad set of tooling covering multiple programming models and frameworks. If you are doing container / cloud development, there is integrated functionality for working with Red Hat OpenShift, Kubernetes, Red Hat Container Development Kit, and Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes. For integration projects, there is tooling covering Camel and Red Hat Fuse that can be used in both local and cloud deployments.

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How to call the OpenShift REST API from C#

How to call the OpenShift REST API from C#

When you want to do automated tasks for builds and deployments with Red Hat OpenShift, you might want to take advantage of the OpenShift REST API. In scripts you can use oc CLI command which talks to the REST APIs. However there are times when it is more convenient to do this directly from your C# code without having to invoke an external program. This is the value of having an infrastructure platform that is exposed as services with an open API.

If you want to call the API from your C# code, you have to create a request object, call the API, and parse the response object. The upstream project, OpenShift Origin, provides a Swagger 2.0 specification and you can generate a client library for each programming language. Of course, C# is supported.  This isn’t a new approach, Kubernetes has a repository that is generated by Swagger Codegen.

For C#, we can use Microsoft Visual Studio to generate a C# client library for a REST API. In this article, I’ll walk you through the process of generating the library from the definition.

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