Red Hat JBoss EAP

Curse you choices! Kubernetes or Application Servers? (Part 3)

Curse you choices! Kubernetes or Application Servers? (Part 3)

This is the finale of a series on whether Kubernetes is the new Application Server. In this part I discuss the choice between Kubernetes, a traditional application server, and alternatives.  Such alternatives can be referred to as “Just enough Application Server”, like Thorntail. There are several articles on Thorntail (previously known as Wildfly Swarm) on the Red Hat Developer blog. A good introduction to Thorntail is in the 2.2 product announcement.

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Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 2

Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 2

This is the second half of my series covering how to use Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces to develop a Java Enterprise Edition (now Jakarta EE) application using Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP) in the cloud on Red Hat OpenShift/Kubernetes. In the first part, we saw how to:

  • Bring your own tools by extending Red Hat’s provided stacks
  • Register your own stack within Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces
  • Create your workspace using your stack and embedding your JEE project located on a Git repository

For this second part, we’ll start configuring the workspace by adding some helpful settings and commands for building and running a JBoss EAP project. We’ll then see how to use the local JBoss EAP instance for deploying and debugging our application. Finally, we’ll create a factory so that we’ll be able to share our work and propose an on-demand configured development environment for anyone that needs to collaborate on our project.

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Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 1

Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 1

It has been just one month since the announcement of the release of Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 1.0.0 Beta. Because the cloud/browser-based IDE may be full of promises, developers are usually suspicious, considering them as toys for occasional coders but not suitable for software craftsmen. But you’ll quickly see that Red Hat’s offering can be a good companion for building tailor-made environments.

The goal of this two-part series is to give a walk-through of using Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces to develop a Java EE (now Jakarta EE) application using Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP). I’ll give you details on how to bring your own tools, configure your workspace with helpful commands for JBoss EAP, and share everything so you can easily onboard new developers.

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How to integrate a remote Red Hat AMQ 7 cluster on Red Hat JBoss EAP 7

How to integrate a remote Red Hat AMQ 7 cluster on Red Hat JBoss EAP 7

It is very common in an integration landscape to have different components connected using a messaging system such as Red Hat AMQ 7 (RHAMQ 7). In this landscape, usually, there are JEE application servers, such as Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7 (JBoss EAP 7), to deploy and run applications connected to the messaging system.

This article describes in detail how to integrate a remote RHAMQ 7 cluster on a JBoss EAP 7 server, and it covers in detail the different configurations and components and some tips to improve your message-driven beans (MDBs) applications.

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Modernize your application deployment with Lift and Shift

Modernize your application deployment with Lift and Shift

For many software modernization projects, it’s all about learning to love, lift, and shift. No, wait. It’s all about learning to love lift and shift. The basic idea behind lift and shift is to modernize how an existing application is packaged and deployed. Because it’s not about rewriting the application itself, lift and shift is typically quick to implement.

Modern development environments rely on containers for packaging and deployment. A modern environment also uses a continuous integration / continuous deployment (CI/CD) system that automatically builds, tests, and deploys an application whenever its source code changes.

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Are App Servers Dead in the Age of Kubernetes? (Part 2)

Are App Servers Dead in the Age of Kubernetes? (Part 2)

Welcome to the second in a series of posts on Kubernetes, application servers, and the future. Part 1, Kubernetes is the new application operating environment, discussed Kubernetes and its place in application development. In this part, we explore application servers and their role in relation to Kubernetes.

You may recall from  that we were exploring the views put forth in Why Kubernetes is The New Application Server and thinking about what those views mean for Java EE, Jakarta EE, Eclipse MicroProfile, and application servers. Is it a curtain call for application servers? Are we seeing the start of an imminent decline in their favor and usage?

Before answering that, we need to discuss the use case for application servers. Then can we decide whether it’s still a valid use case.

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Kubernetes is the new application operating environment (Part 1)

Kubernetes is the new application operating environment (Part 1)

This is the first in a series of articles that consider the role of Kubernetes and application servers. Do application servers need to exist? Where does the current situation leave developers trying to choose the right path forward for their applications?

Why Kubernetes is the new application server

By now you’ve likely read “Why Kubernetes is The New Application Server” and you might be wondering what that means for you. How does it impact Java EE or Jakarta EE and Eclipse MicroProfile? What about application servers or fat JARs? Is it the end as we’ve known it for nearly two decades?

In reality, it doesn’t impact the worldview for most. It’s in line with the efforts of a majority of vendors around Docker and Kubernetes deployments over the last few years. In addition, there’s greater interest in service mesh infrastructures, such as Istio, and how they can further assist with managing Kubernetes deployments.

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How to integrate A-MQ 6.3 on Red Hat JBoss EAP 7

How to integrate A-MQ 6.3 on Red Hat JBoss EAP 7

This article describes in detail how to integrate Red Hat A-MQ 6.3 on Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) 7 and covers in detail the admin-object configuration, especially the pool-name configuration. The attribute pool-name for the admin-object explanation can lead to confusion. In this post, I will try to clarify many of the steps, give an overview of the components, and how they fit together.

The JBoss EAP requires the configuration of a resource adapter as a central component for integration with the A-MQ 6.3. In addition, the MDBs configuration on the EAP is required to enable the JMS consumers. On the A-MQ 6.3, the configuration of the Transport Connectors is required to open the communication channel with the EAP.

All the steps required to configure EAP 7 to use A-MQ 6.3 as an external JMS broker are described here:

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