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Processing CloudEvents with Eclipse Vert.x

Processing CloudEvents with Eclipse Vert.x

Our connected world is full of events that are triggered or received by different software services. One of the big issues is that event publishers tend to describe events differently and in ways that are mostly incompatible with each other.

To address this, the Serverless Working Group from the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) recently announced version 0.2 of the CloudEvents specification. The specification aims to describe event data in a common, standardized way. To some degree, a CloudEvent is an abstract envelope with some specified attributes that describe a concrete event and its data.

Working with CloudEvents is simple. This article shows how to use the powerful JVM toolkit provided by Vert.x to either generate or receive and process CloudEvents.

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What, No Python in RHEL 8 Beta?

What, No Python in RHEL 8 Beta?

TL;DR Of course we have Python! You just need to specify if you want Python 3 or 2 as we didn’t want to set a default. Give yum install python3 and/or yum install python2 a try. Or, if you want to see what we recommend you install yum install @python36 or yum install @python27. Read on for why:

For prior versions of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and most Linux Distributions, users have been locked to the system version of Python unless they got away from the system’s package manager. While this can be true for a lot of tools (ruby, node, Perl, php) the Python use case is more complicated because so many Linux tools (like yum) rely on Python. In order to improve the experience for RHEL 8 users, we have moved the Python used by the system “off to the side” and we introduced the concept of Application Streams based on Modularity.

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Python in RHEL 8

Python in RHEL 8

Ten years ago, the developers of the Python programming language decided to clean things up and release a backwards-incompatible version, Python 3. They initially underestimated the impact of the changes, and the popularity of the language. Still, in the last decade, the vast majority of community projects has migrated to the new version, and major projects are now dropping support for Python 2.

In Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, Python 3.6 is the default. But Python 2 remains available in RHEL 8.

Using Python in RHEL 8

To install Python, type yum install python3.

To run Python, type python3.

If that doesn’t work for you, or you need more details, read on!

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How to install Python 3 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

How to install Python 3 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

This article shows how to install Python 3, pip, venv, virtualenv, and pipenv on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. After following the steps in this article, you should be in a good position to follow many Python guides and tutorials using RHEL.  Note: For RHEL 8 installs, See Python on RHEL 8.

Using Python virtual environments is a best practice to isolate project-specific dependencies and create reproducible environments. Other tips and FAQs for working with Python and software collections on RHEL 7 are also covered.

There are a number of different ways to get Python 3 installed on RHEL. This article uses Red Hat Software Collections because these give you a current Python installation that is built and supported by Red Hat. During development, support might not seem that important to you. However, support is important to those who have to deploy and operate the applications you write. To understand why this is important, consider what happens when your application is in production and a critical security vulnerability in a core library (for example SSL/TLS) is discovered. This type of scenario is why many enterprises use Red Hat.

Python 3.6 is used in this article. It was the most recent, stable release when this was written. However, you should be able to use these instructions for any of the versions of Python in Red Hat Software Collections including 2.7, 3.4, 3.5, and future collections such as 3.7.

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Using the STOMP Protocol with Apache ActiveMQ Artemis Broker

Using the STOMP Protocol with Apache ActiveMQ Artemis Broker

In this article, we will use a Python-based messaging client to connect and subscribe to a topic with a durable subscription in the Apache ActiveMQ Artemis broker. We will use the text-based STOMP protocol to connect and subscribe to the broker. STOMP clients can communicate with any STOMP message broker to provide messaging interoperability among many languages, platforms, and brokers.

If you need to brush up on the difference between persistence and durability in messaging, check Mary Cochran’s article on developers.redhat.com/blog.

A similar process can be used with Red Hat AMQ 7. The broker in Red Hat AMQ 7 is based on the Apache ActiveMQ Artemis project. See the overview on developers.redhat.com for more information.

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How to install Python Flask on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

How to install Python Flask on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

I recently got my zero-dollar developer copy of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL, version 7.5) and built a virtual machine (VM) to run it. There it was, on my PC, running in VirtualBox…a gleaming, shiny, brand-spanking-new VM running RHEL. Whatever shall I do with it?

Then I got the idea: I’ll install the Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) and build some Python-based containers. I’ll use Flask, a terrific microframework that makes building RESTful services easy.

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Introducing conu – Scripting Containers Made Easier

Introducing conu – Scripting Containers Made Easier

There has been a need for a simple, easy-to-use handler for writing tests and other code around containers that would implement helpful methods and utilities. For this we introduce conu, a low-level Python library.

This project has been driven from the start by the requirements of container maintainers and testers. In addition to basic image and container management methods, it provides other often used functions, such as container mount, shortcut methods for getting an IP address, exposed ports, logs, name, image extending using source-to-image, and many others.

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Create a scalable REST API with Falcon and RHSCL

Create a scalable REST API with Falcon and RHSCL

APIs are critical to automation, integration and developing cloud-native applications, and it’s vital they can be scaled to meet the demands of your user-base. In this article, we’ll create a database-backed REST API based on the Python Falcon framework using Red Hat Software Collections (RHSCL), test how it performs, and scale-out in response to a growing user-base.

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The GDB Python API

GDB has evolved in the last several years to provide a Python API. This series of articles will look at how a user can program GDB with the API and will also take an in-depth look at several features of that API. But, before we begin, a small history lesson is needed and a look at just why an API was needed.

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