Build your next cloud-based PaaS in under an hour

The charter of Open Innovation Labs is to help our customers accelerate application development and realize the latest advancements in software delivery, by providing skills, mentoring, and tools. Some of the challenges I frequently hear from customers are those around Platform as a Service (PaaS) environment provisioning and configuration. This article is first in the series of articles that guide you through installation configuration and usage of the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform
(OCP) on Amazon Web Services (AWS).

This installation addresses cloud based security group creation, Amazon Route 53 based DNS, creates a server farm that survives power cycles, and configures OCP for web based authentication and persistent registry. This article and companion video (view below) eliminates the pain-points of a push button installation and validation of a four node Red Hat OCP cluster on AWS.

By the end of the tutorial, you should have a working Red Hat OCP PaaS that is ready to facilitate your team’s application development and DevOps pipeline.

Please note: The setup process uses Red Hat Ansible and an enhanced version of the openshift-ansible aws community installer.

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Un module Puppet pour tuned-adm (Français)

Il y a quelques mois, j’ai développé et publié une petite extension Puppet pour tuned-adm. En effet, cette commande est une fonctionnalité assez appréciable de RHEL, et il m’a semblé donc pertinent d’évoquer cette dernière sur Red Hat developer blog.

Tour d’horizon de ‘tuned-adm’

Pour faire court, cette commande va s’occuper des nombreux fins réglages du système d’exploitation pour vous, selon l’usage que vous souhaitez faire de ce dernier. Par exemple, si vous utilisez le système comme un simple serveur, vous pourrez utiliser le profil prédéfini ‘throughput-performance’. Si vous utilisez votre système sur un portable, à des fins de bureautique, vous opterez probablement pour le profil ‘powersave’, qui optimise le noyau pour réduire autant que possible la consommation de la batterie.

Pour vous donner une meilleure idée des profils disponibles, il suffit d’exécuter sur son système la commande suivante:

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PuppetConf 2014 – Red Hat's Diane Mueller to speak

Building Community: One Puppet Module at a Time – Diane Mueller, Red Hat & Diego Castro, Getup Cloud

puppetconf logoPresenter: Diane Mueller
Co-Presenter: Diego Castro

OpenShift Origin is a complex application to deploy, manage and scale. As a Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) is a living (almost breathing) application, we leverage Puppet to give system administrators the power to easily automate repetitive tasks, quickly and proactively deploy the critical resources on a wide variety of infrastructures, on-premises, on bare metal or in the cloud .

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Deployment to Upgrade: Puppet OpenStack Modules Are Your Friends

Since the announcement of RDO and Red Hat OpenStack at the Spring 2013 OpenStack Summit, these have arguably become two of the most popular ways to install OpenStack. Both use the puppet-openstack modules to install OpenStack, and are just a sampling of the OpenStack installers that are based on Puppet.

While the modules were created here at Puppet Labs, earlier this year we released them to the community as a set of projects in Stackforge. The vibrant community of contributors who keep making the modules more awesome continues to grow.

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Convergence, Immutability, and Image-based Deployments

As our industry continues to adopt lean methodologies in an effort to improve the workflow of product deliverables, it’s important that the products developed using these patterns are reliable. When speaking from an application infrastructure perspective, or the Ops side of DevOps, this means that we must continue to improve resiliency, predictability, and consistency, alongside streamlining our development workflows to allow for failing fast, and failing often.When faced with a critical incident, it’s dissatisfying to find that the root cause was an environment delta that only affected a subset of your infrastructure.  You begin asking questions like, “Why aren’t all our nodes configured with the same parameters? Why aren’t we running the same package versions on all of our nodes? Why is the staging environment different from production?”

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A Puppet Module for tuned-adm

Some months ago, I developed and released a small Puppet module for tuned-adm. As this tool is a nice feature of RHEL, I think it is only fair from me to advertise about it here, on the Red Hat developer blog.

Quick overview of ‘tuned-adm’

(Photo credit: Accretion Disc)

To make this brief, this command will take care of tuning the operating system for you, based on the usage you want to make of it. For instance, if you want this system to be a regular server, you’ll use the ‘throughput-performance’ profile, while if you are running your Linux kernel on a laptop, you might prefer the ‘powersave’ profile, to protect your battery, and make it last longer.

To have a better idea of what options are available on your system, you can simply run the following command:

$ tuned-adm list
Available profiles:
- virtual-guest
- latency-performance
- powersave
- balanced
- throughput-performance
- virtual-host
Current active profile: /usr/lib/tuned/powersave/tuned.conf

And with the command ‘active’, you can quickly check, which profile has been activated:

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Managing OpenStack with The Foreman

OpenStack is picking up a lot of steam these days, but getting it installed can be a hassle. Lots of puppet-based installers have popped up to automate this arduous task. Using Foreman, however, administrators can not only configure and install OpenStack using puppet, but provision & add new compute nodes at their fancy.

The Foreman is a Ruby on Rails application that does configuration management with puppet and provisioning. We’ll use both of these features to make using & administering OpenStack easier. Our installer leverages PackStack, which includes great puppet modules for setting up OpenStack. Combining these to setup and manage OpenStack Grizzly is a breeze!

Requirements

  1. At least three machines running RHEL 6.4 with an active subscription to RHEL OpenStack Platform or Red Hat Cloud Infrastructure.. We recommend your OpenStack Compute & Controller nodes run on bare metal.
  2. Each machine needs to have a resolvable FQDN
  3. Each machine needs to be subscribed to a proper RHEL subscription
  4. The Foreman server should have its firewall configured to allow inbound network traffic on TCP ports 80, 443 and 8140 for Foreman and Puppet to function correctly
  5. The host running Foreman may be running selinux in Enforcing mode, but you must first install the ruby193-foreman-selinux package. Both the OpenStack controller and compute nodes can also run in enforcing mode if you install the openstack-selinux package. You must also manually set a boolean on the controller node: setsebool -P httpd_can_network_connect on

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