prometheus

A Beginner’s Guide to Kubernetes (PodCTL Podcast #38)

A Beginner’s Guide to Kubernetes (PodCTL Podcast #38)

If you aren’t following the OpenShift Blog, you might not be aware of the PodCTL podcast. It’s a free weekly tech podcast covering containers, kubernetes, and OpenShift hosted by Red Hat’s Brian Gracely (@bgracely) and Tyler Britten (@vmtyler). I’m reposting this episode here on the Red Hat Developer Blog because I think their realization is spot on—while early adopters might be deep into Kubernetes, many are just starting and could benefit from some insights.

Original Introduction from blog.openshift.com:

The Kubernetes community now has 10 releases (2.5 yrs) of software and experience. We just finished KubeCon Copenhagen, OpenShift Commons Gathering, and Red Hat Summit and we heard lots of companies talk about their deployments and journeys. But many of them took a while (12–18) months to get to where they are today. This feels like the “early adopters” and we’re beginning to get to the “crossing the chasm” part of the market. So thought we’d discuss some of the basics, lessons learned, and other things people could use to “fast-track” what they need to be successful with Kubernetes.

The podcast will always be available on the Red Hat OpenShift blog (search: #PodCTL), as well as on RSS FeedsiTunesGoogle PlayStitcherTuneIn, and all your favorite podcast players.

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Visualizing Smog Sensor Data with the help of Vert.x, Prometheus, and Grafana

Visualizing Smog Sensor Data with the help of Vert.x, Prometheus, and Grafana

Air pollution is a major problem in many cities around the globe. Some people in Stuttgart, Germany have developed cheap smog sensors that people can install on their balconies and other convenient places and then report data to a central site. I have written about that on OpenSource.com. The data is sent to a central server, from where it is visualized on a map. At the time of writing the above article, there was no way of seeing how the value has changed over time. Meanwhile, there is a visualization of the last 24 hours available on the map.

Continue reading “Visualizing Smog Sensor Data with the help of Vert.x, Prometheus, and Grafana”

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