June 2018 ISO C++ Meeting Trip Report (Core Language)

The Summer 2018 ISO C++ standards committee meeting this year was back in Rapperswil, Switzerland. The new features for C++2a are coming fast now; the Core language working group had very little time for issue processing because of all the proposal papers coming to us from the Evolution working group.

Red Hat sent three of us to the meeting, to cover different tracks: myself (Core), Jonathan Wakely (Library), and Torvald Riegel (Parallelism/Concurrency).  Overall, I thought the meeting was very successful; we made significant progress in a lot of areas.

New C++ language features that were accepted at this meeting:

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March 2018 ISO C++ Meeting Trip Report (SG1: Concurrency and Parallelism)

This year’s Winter ISO C++ Standard Committee meeting was held in March in Jacksonville, Florida. A number of larger features, for which there is substantial interest but which are also difficult to get right, were discussed:

  • Concepts, along with Concept types from the Ranges TS; see P0898 and n4685
  • Modules; see n4689
  • Coroutines; see n4723
  • Networking; see n4711
  • Executors; see p0443

Jason Merrill’s recently published trip report covers the core language topics. This report focuses on the topics of interest to the Concurrency and Parallelism Study Group (SG1).  The “big ticket” items discussed in SG1 during the week were:

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March 2018 ISO C++ Meeting Trip Report (Core Language)

The March C++ ISO Standard meeting this year was back in Jacksonville, Florida.  As usual, Red Hat sent three of us to the meeting: Torvald Riegel, Thomas Rodgers, and myself.  Jonathan Wakely attended via speakerphone.  There were 121 people attending the plenary meeting at the beginning of the week.

This meeting was mostly about new features for C++20, particularly when and how to merge Technical Specifications into the draft standard.  In the core language, the ones trying to make C++20 are Concepts (already partially merged), Coroutines, and Modules.  There was a lot of discussion around all three.

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October 2016 ISO C Meeting Report

Trip Report: October 2016 WG14 Meeting

In October 2016, I attended the WG14 (C language committee) meeting in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The meeting was hosted by the Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT) at the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). We had 25 representatives from 18 organizations in attendance, including CERT, Cisco, IBM, INRIA, Intel, LDRA, Oracle, Perennial, Plum Hall, Siemens, and the University of Cambridge. It was a productive four days spent on two major areas:

  • Work on C11 defect reports aimed at the upcoming C11 Technical Corrigendum (TC) expected to be finalized in 2017. This will be the last revision of C11 to be published. The next revision of C will be a “major” version that is for the time being referred to as C2X.
  • Review of proposals for the next revision of C, C2X. To meet the TC 2017 schedule some C11 defects will have to be deferred to C2X. The C2X charter is in N2086.

Below is a list of some of the interesting C2X proposals the group discussed.

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Leap second – "I Belong to You"

Recently, I was working on a research topic for Red Hat Insights which is a hosted service designed to help people proactively identify and resolve technical issues of Red Hat products. During that time a Chinese romantic comedy film;  “I Belonged to You” was released. On hearing the name, I thought to myself, “that title couldn’t be any better for this post”. Just like the film goes, “I’m only a passerby in your world”. So did the leap second! And soon another leap second is coming – let’s cherish it this time. These little moments in time can be incredibly challenging, and also incredibly interesting. But, before we start talking about leap seconds, let’s introduce some background about time itself.

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How To Setup Integration & SOA Tooling For JBoss Developer Studio 10

 The release of the latest JBoss Developer Studio (JBDS) brings with it the questions around how to get started with the various JBoss Integration and BPM product tool sets that are not installed out of the box.

In this series of articles we will outline for you how to install each set of tools and explain which products they are supporting. This should help you in making an informed decision about what tooling you might want to install before embarking on your next JBoss integration project.

There are four different software packs that offer tooling for various JBoss integration products:

  1. JBoss Integration and SOA Development
  2. JBoss Data Virtualization Development
  3. JBoss Business Process and Rules Development

    Tooling is available under software updates with early access enabled.

  4. JBoss Fuse Development

This article will outline how to get started with the JBoss integration and SOA development tooling and any of the JBDS 10 series of releases.

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Data-hiding in ES6 (JavaScript) from an Object Oriented perspective

For a long time during my early career, I was an OO — object oriented — developer. I genuflected regularly in front of the altar of data encapsulation, object hierarchies and static typing. And the syntax. Oh the syntax!

But I have changed, of course, and so much of the dogma and ceremony that I participated in during those times has come to seem a lot less important than it was 20 years ago. Languages, and developers evolve. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t some really good lessons to learn.

Take, for instance, data encapsulation.

When I first began to seriously look at JavaScript as a language, data encapsulation – or the lack of it – was one of the things that really stuck in my old OO craw. While I loved the simplicity of the {} data structure, I hated the fact that most properties I chose to add to it were typically just there – sticking out for everyone to see and perhaps corrupt. The language didn’t make it very easy to keep this data protected. How do we handle this?

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August 2016 GNU Toolchain Update

The GNU Toolchain is a collection of  programming tools produced by the GNU Project. The tools are often packaged together due to their common use for developing software applications, operating systems, and low level software for embedded systems.

This blog is part of a regular series covering the latest changes and improvements in the components that make up this Toolchain.  Apart from the announcement of new releases however, the features described here are at the very bleeding edge of software development in the tools.  This does mean that it may be a while before they make it into production releases, although interested parties can always build their own copies of the toolchain in order to try them out.

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