process

Reducing data inconsistencies with Red Hat Process Automation Manager

Reducing data inconsistencies with Red Hat Process Automation Manager

Managing data reconciliation through a specific process is a common necessity for projects that require Digital Process Automation (formerly known as Business Process Management), and Red Hat Process Automation Manager helps to address such a requirement. This article provides good practices and a technique for satisfying data reconciliation in a structured and clean way.

Red Hat Process Automation Manager was formerly known as Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite, so it’s worth mentioning that jBPM is the upstream project that fuels Process Automation Manager. The blog post From BPM and business automation to digital automation platforms explains the reasons behind the new name and shares exciting news for this major release.

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The Evolution of Technology in the Context of Software Development & Design Process: Take-away from PatternFly Conference

The Evolution of Technology in the Context of Software Development & Design Process: Take-away from PatternFly Conference

Last Sunday, I returned home, India, after attending a series of collaborative sessions in Raleigh, NC, with many designers and developers across Red Hat and the open-source community, at the UX Summit and the PatternFly Conference. The whole experience was inspiring, informative and at the same time thought provoking with many takeaways, out of which the most interesting for me was that cumulatively all the inspiring talks from the speakers of the conference were implicitly hinting towards a clue. How our attempt to solve the existing technical solutions also impact the existing work process and thereby demand a rethink on the process blocks we use.

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A Post Mortem on Madness, or Why Process Matters

A Post Mortem on Madness, or Why Process Matters

So, my first programming job was part of the Duke Basketball IT department, while I was enrolled as an undergraduate. To be fair, it wasn’t really a programming job, mostly just churning out scouting reports and videos, but it was a lot of fun. I really liked basketball back then. I wasn’t any good at it but I enjoyed playing all the same, and I had a lot of fun watching it. And as most people know, the culmination of the college basketball season is a 68-team single elimination tournament called March Madness. And it is just that, Madness; employee productivity plummets, players, coaches, and spectators spend thousands of dollars traveling all over the country with a single day’s notice, and a lot of scouting reports get generated. Most people look forward to it, both the participants and the fans, but due to a series of mistakes and poor decisions, I have grown to dread March Madness…

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Five-Day Sprint Process meets Raleigh Innovators Program – Part 5 of 5

My Experience

When I heard that HR would be exploring changes to our employee review process, I made a mental note to follow up on that later in the year. I’d only ever been an end user of this process. I didn’t know what an annual review should look like, but I could see the same room for improvement that Red Hatters voiced on internal mailing lists and at the water cooler. I work in IT, not HR, but am passionate about building up people, morale, and community in my workspace. I’d even poked around HR and considered transferring departments. So, you can imagine how excited I felt when I was offered a spot on this project team out of the blue. I got to step into the world of HR full-time for three months and have a greater impact on the 11,000+ people of this company on a larger scale than I ever imagined.

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Five-Day Sprint Process meets Raleigh Innovators Program – Part 4 of 5

A 5-day sprint in 45 minutes

Yes, that’s ridiculous.  The concept of a five-day sprint is crazy enough, but to attempt it in 45 minutes is just plain nuts.

In this series, I wrote about what it was like to participate in the five-day process.  After further study, I seized the opportunity to evangelize it to the technical communication community outside of Red Hat.

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Five-Day Sprint Process meets Raleigh Innovators Program – Part 3 of 5

The Google Ventures five-day sprint process is amazing, but any project can suffer due to human factors.  The way we complete tasks, creatively brainstorm, interact with each other, and feel motivated can become pain points in any project.  While SPRINT: How to Solve Big Problems and Test New Ideas in Just Five Days wards off potential challenge points specific to this sprint methodology, here are my additional recommendations:

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Five-Day Sprint Process meets Raleigh Innovators Program – Part 2 of 5

When we began the Google Ventures 5-Day Sprint Cycle, our team quickly realized that we had to blend it with Red Hat’s Open Decision-Making Framework (ODF).  The Sprint process already called for 5 individual customer interviews per sprint.  That meant 5 per week to get just enough of a trend to adjust plans for the next sprint.  We started with that, which was great, but Red Hat currently has 11,000 employees.  We need more buy-in for company-wide acceptance.  Transparent, collaborative decision-making is key to how Red Hat does work the open source way.  At first, it seemed like a big challenge to blend the five-day process with our existing framework.  They seemed so different, and we had a tight deadline.  What we learned, was quite the opposite.  Both methodologies rely on frequent user engagement, but ODF is a five-day sprint on steroids.  We amped up our efforts to engage the whole company.

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Five-Day Sprint Process meets Raleigh Innovators Program – Part 1 of 5

Hi, Red Hat Developers!  I’m new to the Red Hat Developers blog and wanted to give you a quick introduction before diving into the Innovators Program and how you can use some of the theories and processes in your day to day.  I’m a Red Hatter and I specialize in UX and knowledge management for internal support at Red Hat.  Basically, I make sure Red Hat employees and the teams that support them get everything they need out of our internal support portal.  This ranges from customer surveys to web form design to knowledge management.  Most recently, I took a three-month hiatus from this role to participate in the Raleigh Innovators Program.

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Introducing Business Process Management with JBoss BPM

 

introducing business process management

(This article was excerpted from the book Effective Business Process Management with JBoss BPM by Eric D. Schabell.)

Organizations are constantly being tested in the markets in which they operate by shifting expectations of their customers, and by competitors looking to provide better value at a lower cost. This tension is the catalyst that continually pushes organizations to search for ways to improve their services, improve the speed which they deliver value to their customers, enable employees to get more done with less administrative overhead, and most importantly, to constantly grow by generating more revenue. This is the basis of BPM, to be able to identify and capture processes in an organization to create repeatable, measurable and consistent execution of goals to drive their business forward.

When an organization studies its operations, it discovers there are many processes used in its daily business. These processes are often not well thought out, or they were created to complete some aspect of the daily business, with little thought given to improving efficiency. At this point the organization looks for the first steps for improving through automation the processes that represent business value.

Business value could be anything that drives organizational goals forward to make customers happy, and thereby generate more revenue. This business value can be anything, such as keeping track of interaction with a customer. If that data could be captured, the marketing department could search a customer’s behavioral patterns to decide what products and services to market to a particular person. It would take mass marketing out of the equation and allow for direct, specific marketing towards individual customers’ needs.

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