Podman

How to customize Fedora CoreOS for dedicated workloads with OSTree

How to customize Fedora CoreOS for dedicated workloads with OSTree

In part one of this series, I introduced Fedora CoreOS (and Red Hat CoreOS) and explained why its immutable and atomic nature is important for running containers. I then walked you through getting Fedora CoreOS, creating an Ignition file, booting Fedora CoreOS, logging in, and running a test container. In this article, I will walk you through customizing Fedora CoreOS and making use of its immutable and atomic nature.

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Building freely distributed containers with Podman and Red Hat UBI

Building freely distributed containers with Podman and Red Hat UBI

DevNation tech talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions and code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about building containers with Podman and Red Hat Universal Base Image (UBI) from Scott McCarty and Burr Sutter.

We will cover how to build and run containers based on UBI using just your regular user account—no daemon, no root, no fuss. Finally, we will order the de-resolution of all of our containers with a really cool command. After this talk, you will have new tools at the ready to help you find, run, build, and share container images.

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Verifying signatures of Red Hat container images

Verifying signatures of Red Hat container images

Security-conscious organizations are accustomed to using digital signatures to validate application content from the Internet. A common example is RPM package signing. Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) validates signatures of RPM packages by default.

In the container world, a similar paradigm should be adhered to. In fact, all container images from Red Hat have been digitally signed and have been for several years. Many users are not aware of this because early container tooling was not designed to support digital signatures.

In this article, I’ll demonstrate how to configure a container engine to validate signatures of container images from the Red Hat registries for increased security of your containerized applications.

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Working with Red Hat Enterprise Linux Universal Base Images (UBI)

Working with Red Hat Enterprise Linux Universal Base Images (UBI)

If you’re like me—a developer who works with customers who rely on the tried-and-true Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), works with containerized applications, and also prefers to work with Fedora Linux as their desktop operating system—you’re excited by the announcement of the Universal Base Images (UBI). This article shows how UBI actually works, by building the container image for a simple PHP application.

With UBI, you can build and redistribute container images based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux without requiring a Red Hat subscription. Users of UBI-based container images do not need Red Hat subscriptions. No more extra work creating CentOS-based container images for your community projects or for your customers that prefer self-support.

I tested all these steps on my personal Fedora 29 system, and they should work on any Linux distribution. I am also a big fan of the new container tools such as Podman, which should be available to your favorite Linux distribution. If you are working on a Windows or MacOS system, you can replace the Podman commands with Docker.

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 now generally available

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 now generally available

I think Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 is the most developer-friendly Red Hat Enterprise Linux that we’ve delivered, and I hope you agree. Let’s get down to business, or rather coding, so you can see for yourself. You can read the Red Hat corporate press release.

For this article, I’ll quickly recap Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 features (architecture, containers), introduce the very new and cool Red Hat Universal Base Image (UBI), and provide a handy list of developer resources to get you started on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.

TL;DR

Download RHEL 8 now

Download RHEL 8 image

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Podman basics cheat sheet

Podman basics cheat sheet

Here and elsewhere, we get a lot of questions about post-Docker container tools in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.6 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 beta. Tools like podman, buildah, and skopeo enable you to create and manage rootless containers, which are containers that don’t require root access to be built and deployed. To help you master the basics, we’re happy to offer a new podman basics cheat sheet.

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How to run systemd in a container

How to run systemd in a container

I have been talking about systemd in a container for a long time. Way back in 2014, I wrote “Running systemd within a Docker Container.” And, a couple of years later, I wrote another article, “Running systemd in a non-privileged container,” explaining how things hadn’t gotten much better. In that article, I stated, “Sadly, two years later if you google Docker systemd, this is still the article people see—it’s time for an update.” I also linked to a talk about how upstream Docker and upstream systemd would not compromise. In this article, I’ll look at the progress that’s been made and how Podman can help.

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Monitoring container vitality and availability with Podman

Monitoring container vitality and availability with Podman

Not long after Podman developed a certain level of stability and functionality we started to hear questions like, “What about container healthchecks?” It was a tough question with no easy, obvious answers. My colleagues and I would occasionally discuss healthchecks, but we are a daemonless environment, which makes this kind of thing challenging. Without a long-running process or daemon to schedule healthchecks, we needed to look at other parts of the operating system to launch them. Recently, the questions grew more pronounced, and it was high time we resolved this for our users.

I am pleased to say that the latest Podman release 1.2 now has the ability to perform container healthchecks. This article describes healthchecks and explains how we implemented them for Podman.

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Build and run Buildah inside a Podman container

Build and run Buildah inside a Podman container

This past Christmas I gave my wife a set of nesting dolls similar to Russian Matryoshka dolls. If you’re not familiar with them, they consist of a wooden doll, which opens to reveal another doll, inside which you’ll find another doll, and so on until you get to the smallest and often most ornate doll of them all.  This concept got me thinking about nesting containers.

I thought I’d try building my own nesting container using Podman to create a container in which I could do Buildah development and also spin up Buildah containers and images. Once this Podman container was created, I could move it to any Linux platform that supported Podman and do development on Buildah from it. In this article, I’ll show how I set it up.

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