Red Hat scripting languages for beta: adds Ruby 2.5, Perl 5.26; updates PHP 7.1.8

Twice a year, Red Hat distributes new versions of compiler toolsets, scripting languages, open source databases, and/or web tools, etc. so that application developers will have access to the latest, stable versions. These Red Hat supported offerings are packaged as Red Hat Software Collections (scripting languages, open source databases, web tools, etc.), Red Hat Developer Toolset (GCC), and the recently added compiler toolsets Clang/LLVM, Go, and Rust. All are yum installable, and are included in most Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscriptions and all Red Hat Enterprise Linux Developer Subscriptions. Most Red Hat Software Collections and Red Hat Developer Toolset components are also available as Linux container images for hybrid cloud development across Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, etc.

Red Hat Software Collections 3.1 beta brings the following new/updated scripting languages:

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PHP Configuration Tips

RHEL 7 provides the Apache HTTP Server version 2.4 and PHP version 5.4.

The most common configuration for Apache httpd and PHP uses, but this has some limitations and drawbacks:

  • a single PHP version of mod_php can be used
  • mod_php run in the httpd process, without any isolation
  • mod_phpis only supported for the prefork MPM

This article will explain how to configure Apache httpd to delegate PHP scripts execution to a backend using the FastCGI protocol, how to use a more recent PHP version, how to run multiple PHP versions, and how to improve Apache httpd performance.

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Announcing release of Software Collections, Developer Toolset, new compilers

I am pleased to announce the general availability of numerous Red Hat curated collections of the latest, stable application development tools, languages, compilers, databases, and more. Created for Red Hat Enterprise Linux, developers can access these via the following open source offerings:
  • Red Hat Software Collections
  • Red Hat Developer Toolset
  • New RHEL Compilers: Clang/LLVM, Go, and Rust

Components delivered as Linux Containers can also be used on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform.

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Red Hat updates Python, PHP, Node.js, more; supports new arches

I am pleased to announce the immediate availability of Red Hat Software Collections 3.0 Beta, Red Hat’s newest installment of open source development tools, dynamic languages, databases, and more. Delivered on a separate lifecycle from Red Hat Enterprise Linux with a more frequent release cadence, Red Hat Software Collections bridges development agility and production stability by helping you create modern applications that can be confidently deployed into production. Most of these components are also available in Linux container image format to streamline microservices development.

In addition to these new components having traditional support for x86_64, Red Hat Software Collection 3.0 Beta adds support for three new architectures: s390x, aarch64, and ppc64le.

NEW ADDITIONS to Red Hat Software Collections 3.0 Beta include:

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Cockpit: Your entrypoint to the Containers Management World

Containers are one of the top trend today. Starting working or playing with them could be really hard also if you’ve well understood the theory at their base.

With this article I’ll try to show you some useful tips and tricks to start into containers world, thanks also to the great web interface provided by the Cockpit project.

cockpit--capture-15-cockpit-project-http___cockpit-project-org_

Cockpit overview

Cockpit is an interactive server admin interface.  You’ll find below some a of its great features:

  • Cockpit comes “out of the box” ready for the admin to interact with the system immediately, without installing stuff, configuring access controls, making choices, etc.
  • Cockpit has (as near as makes no difference) zero memory and process footprint on the server when not in use. The job of a server is not to show a pretty UI to admins, but to serve stuff to others. Cockpit starts on demand via socket activation and exits when not in use.
  • Cockpit does not take over your server in such a way that you can then only perform further configuration in Cockpit.
  • Cockpit itself does not have a predefined template or state for the server that it then imposes on the server. It is imperative configuration rather than declarative configuration.
  • Cockpit dynamically updates itself to reflect the current state of the server, within a time frame of a few seconds.
  • Cockpit is firewall friendly: it opens one port for browser connections: by default that is 9090.
  • Cockpit can look different on different operating systems, because it’s the UI for the OS, and not a external tool.
  • Cockpit is pluggable: it allows others to add additional UI pieces.

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Red Hat Software Collections 2.3 now beta

Today, Red Hat announced the beta availability of Red Hat Software Collections 2.3, Red Hat’s newest installment of open source web development tools, dynamic languages, and databases. Delivered on a separate lifecycle from Red Hat Enterprise Linux with a more frequent release cadence, Red Hat Software Collections bridges developer agility and production stability by helping to accelerate the creation of modern applications that can then be more confidently deployed into production.

New additions to Red Hat Software Collections 2.3 Beta include:

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Node.js 4.4, Python 3.5, and Ruby 2.3 Get Started guides on developers.redhat.com

On developers.redhat.com you can find short, focused guides to help you start developing with a number of Red Hat technologies. With the recent release of Red Hat Software Collections (RHSCL) 2.2, a number of Get Started guides have been updated to use the newest software collections, such as Node.js 4.4, Python 3.5, and Ruby 2.3.  These guides give you the steps you need to install the software and get to a simple “Hello, World” in a few minutes. The guides include a few additional package management examples to help you go farther.

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Red Hat Software Collections 2.0 Docker images, Beta release

I’m very happy to announce that Docker images based on collections from Red Hat Software Collections (RHSCL) 2.0 are in beta testing.  The images are available from the Red Hat Container Registry, and we’ve got the set of collections for language, databases and web servers covered – a complete list is below.

If you’ve not tried out the Docker package from RHEL7 Extras, you need to enable the Extras channel, install the docker page, and start the docker service; an extended guide for RHEL Docker is available here.  Once you are set up, pulling the RHSCL Docker images is very simple… for example, you can fetch the Python 3.4 image as follows:

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