OpenStack

Automatic load balancing for PMD threads in Open vSwitch with DPDK

Automatic load balancing for PMD threads in Open vSwitch with DPDK

This article is about the poll mode driver (PMD) automatic load balance feature in Open vSwitch with a Data Plane Development Kit data path (OVS-DPDK). The feature has existed for a while but we’ve recently added new user parameters in Open vSwitch 2.15. Now is a good time to take a look at this feature in OVS-DPDK.

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Customizing and tuning the Kuryr SDN for Red Hat OpenShift 3.11 on Red Hat OpenStack 13

Customizing and tuning the Kuryr SDN for Red Hat OpenShift 3.11 on Red Hat OpenStack 13

In a previous article, I showed you how to customize Red Hat OpenShift software-defined networking (SDN) for your organization’s requirements and restrictions. In this article, we’ll look at using the Kuryr SDN instead. Using Kuryr with OpenShift 3.11 on Red Hat OpenStack 13 changes the customization requirements because Kuryr works directly with OpenStack Neutron and Octavia.

Note: This article builds on the discussion and examples from my previous one. I recommend reading the previous one first.

Background

Traditional OpenShift installations leverage openshift-sdn, which is specific to OpenShift. Using openshift-sdn means that your containers run on a network within a network. This setup, known as double encapsulation, introduces an additional layer of complexity, which becomes apparent when troubleshooting network issues. Double encapsulation also affects network performance due to the overhead of running a network within a network.

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Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 IPI on OpenStack 13: All-in-one setup

Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 IPI on OpenStack 13: All-in-one setup

Months ago, a customer asked me about Red Hat OpenShift on OpenStack, especially regarding the network configuration options available in OpenShift at the node level. In order to give them an answer and increase my confidence on $topic, I’ve considered how to test this scenario.

At the same time, the Italian solution architect “Top Gun Team” was in charge of preparing speeches and demos for the Italian Red Hat Forum (also known as Open Source Day) for the Rome and Milan dates. Brainstorming led me to start my journey toward testing OpenShift 4.2 setup on OpenStack 13 in order to reply to the customer and leverage this effort to build a demo video for Red Hat Forum.

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How to install Red Hat OpenShift 3.11 on OpenStack 13

How to install Red Hat OpenShift 3.11 on OpenStack 13

Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform is a platform-as-a-service (PaaS). It orchestrates and manages containerized applications through Kubernetes. Although OpenShift Container Platform supports cloud-native applications, it also supports custom-built applications. OpenShift Container Platform can run on a hybrid cloud configuration providing the flexibility to expand and grow.

Red Hat OpenStack Platform is an infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS). This means it is a cloud-based platform that provides virtual servers and other resources. Users either manage it through a web-based dashboard, through command-line tools, or through RESTful web services.

If you are considering Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform on OpenStack Platform, there are several advantages, including easily increasing the number of compute nodes and using dynamic storage.

In this article, I will outline the main points required to successfully install Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform on OpenStack Platform. Because my OpenStack knowledge is limited, I reached out to my colleagues for help and will not address too many OpenStack technical details here.

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Dynamic IP Address Management in Open Virtual Network (OVN): Part One

Dynamic IP Address Management in Open Virtual Network (OVN): Part One

Some background

For those unfamiliar, Open Virtual Network (OVN) is a subproject of OpenVswitch (OVS), a performant programmable multi-platform virtual switch. OVN provides the ability to express an overlay network as a series of virtual routers and switches. OVN also provides native methods for setting up Access Control Lists (ACLs), and it functions as an OpenFlow switch, providing services such as DHCP. The components of OVN program OVS on each of the hypervisors in the network. Many of Red Hat’s products, such as Red Hat OpenStack Platform and Red Hat Virtualization, are now using OVN. Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform will be using OVN soon.

Looking around the internet, it’s pretty easy to find high-quality tutorials on the basics of OVN. However, when it comes to more-advanced topics, it sometimes feels like the amount of information is lacking. In this tutorial, we’ll examine dynamic addressing in OVN. You will learn about IP address management (IPAM) options in OVN and how to apply them.

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Debugging Memory Issues with Open vSwitch DPDK

Debugging Memory Issues with Open vSwitch DPDK

Introduction

This article is about debugging out-of-memory issues with Open vSwitch with the Data Plane Development Kit (OvS-DPDK). It explains the situations in which you can run out of memory when using OvS-DPDK and it shows the log entries that are produced in those circumstances. It also shows some other log entries and commands for further debugging.

When you finish reading this article, you will be able to identify that you have an out-of-memory issue and you’ll know how to fix it. Spoiler: Usually having some more memory on the relevant NUMA node works. It is based on OvS 2.9.

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Open vSwitch-DPDK: How Much Hugepage Memory?

Open vSwitch-DPDK: How Much Hugepage Memory?

Introduction

In order to maximize performance of the Open vSwitch DPDK datapath, it pre-allocates hugepage memory. As a user you are responsible for telling Open vSwitch how much hugepage memory to pre-allocate. The question of exactly what value to use often arises. The answer is, it depends.

There is no simple answer as it depends on things like the MTU size of the ports, the MTU differences between ports, and whether those ports are on the same NUMA node. Just to complicate things a bit more, there are multiple overheads, and alignment and rounding need to be accounted for at various places in OVS-DPDK. Everything clear? OK, you can stop reading then!
However, if not, read on.

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Build your Software Defined Data Center with Red Hat CloudForms and Openstack – part 2

Build your Software Defined Data Center with Red Hat CloudForms and Openstack – part 2

Welcome back, here we will continue with the second part of my post, where we will work with Red Hat Cloudforms. If you remember, in our first post we spoke about Red Hat OpenStack Platform 11 (RHOSP). In addition to the blog article, at the end of this article is also a demo video I created to show to our customers/partners how they can build a fully automated software data center.

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Build your Software Defined Data Center with Red Hat CloudForms and Openstack – part 1

Build your Software Defined Data Center with Red Hat CloudForms and Openstack – part 1

In this blog, I would like to show you how you can create your fully software-defined data center with two amazing Red Hat products: Red Hat OpenStack Platform and Red Hat CloudForms. Because of the length of this article, I have broken this down into two parts.

As you probably know, every organization needs to evolve itself becoming a Tech Company, leveraging its own Digital Transformation, embracing or enhancing existing processes, evolving people’s mindset, people’s soft/hard skills and of course using new technologies.

Remember we are living in a digital era where if you don’t change yourself and your organization someone will disrupt your business!

So, how can I become disruptive in my business?

Well, speaking from a purely technical perspective a good approach should consider cloud technologies.

These kinds of technologies can be the first brick of your digital transformation strategy because they can grant business and technologies values.

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