Red Hat Data Grid on Three Clouds (the details behind the demo)

If you saw or heard about the multi-cloud demo at Red Hat Summit 2018, this article details how we ran Red Hat Data Grid in active-active-active mode across three cloud providers. This set up enabled us to show a fail over between cloud providers in real time with no loss of data. In addition to Red Hat Data Grid, we used Vert.x (reactive programming), OpenWhisk (serverless), and Red Hat Gluster Storage (software-defined storage.)

This year’s Red Hat Summit was quite an adventure for all of us. A trip to San Francisco is probably on the bucket list of IT geeks from all over the world. Also, we were able to meet many other Red Hatters, who work remotely for Red Hat as we do.  However, the best part was that we had something important to say: “we believe in the hybrid/multi cloud” and we got to prove that live on stage.

Photo credit: Bolesław Dawidowicz

 

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Announcing .NET Core 2.1 for Red Hat Platforms

We are very pleased to announce the general availability of .NET Core 2.1 for Red Hat Enterprise Linux and OpenShift platforms!

.NET Core is the open-source, cross-platform .NET platform for building microservices. .NET Core is designed to provide the best performance at scale for applications that use microservices and containers. Libraries can be shared with other .NET platforms, such as .NET Framework (Windows) and Xamarin (mobile applications). With .NET Core you have the flexibility of building and deploying applications on Red Hat Enterprise Linux or in containers. Your container-based applications and microservices can easily be deployed to your choice of public or private clouds using Red Hat OpenShift. All of the features of OpenShift and Kubernetes for cloud deployments are available to you.

.NET Core 2.1 continues to broaden its support and tools for microservice development in an open source environment. The latest version of .NET Core includes the following improvements:

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Application Modernization and Migration Tech Talk + Scotland JBug Meetup

I’m heading back to my friends in Scotland to speak at the JBoss User Group (JBug) Scotland next month. It’s a fun group of people who really seem to enjoy working with open source and JBoss software stacks.

First off, on June 6th there will be a wonderful tech talk on application modernization and migration. This is followed by the JBug Scotland hosting a  hands-on workshop. Come and get hands-on experience in a workshop showcasing application development in the cloud using containers, JBoss middleware, services, business logic, and APIs.

The events are on June 6th, 2018 from 14:00 onwards and are scheduled as follows.

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Red Hat OpenShift

Externalized HTTP Session in an OpenShift 3.9 Environment

In this article, I will show how you can implement a common use case that often happens when you migrate a classic Java EE application into a Red Hat OpenShift environment.

Scenario

Usually a classic Java EE application stores a user’s information, such the profile’s configuration, in the HTTP session. In a typical production scenario, there are several application server instances that build a cluster and are used to implement high availability, failover, and load balancing. To make sure that stateful information is preserved across the application server instances, you must distribute your session as described in the Java EE 7 specification section EE.6.4, “Servlet 3.1 Requirements.”

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An API Journey: From Idea to Deployment the Agile Way–Part III

This is part III of a three-part series describing a proposed approach for an agile API lifecycle: from ideation to production deployment. If you missed it or need a refresher, please take some time to read part I and part II.

This series is coauthored with Nicolas Massé, also a Red Hatter, and it is based on our own real-life experiences from our work with the Red Hat customers we’ve met.

In part II, we discovered how ACME Inc. is taking an agile API journey for its new Beer Catalog API deployment. ACME set up modern techniques for continuously testing its API implementation within the continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD) pipeline. Let’s go now to securing the exposition.

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An API Journey: From Idea to Deployment the Agile Way–Part II

This is part II of a three-part series describing a proposed approach for an agile API lifecycle from ideation to production deployment. If you missed part 1 or need a refresher, please take some time to read part I.

This series is coauthored with Nicolas Massé, also a Red Hatter, and it is based on our own real-life experiences from our work with the Red Hat customers we’ve met.

In part I, we explored how ACME Inc. is taking an agile API journey for its new Beer Catalog API, and ACME completed the API ideation, contract design, and sampling stages. Let’s go now to mocking.

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Next DevNation Live: Enterprise Node.js on OpenShift, April 19th, 12 p.m. EDT

The next online DevNation Live Tech Talk is Thursday, April 19th at 12pm EDT. The topic is “Enterprise Node.js on Red Hat OpenShift” presented by Lance Ball, and hosted by Burr Sutter. The popularity of JavaScript on the front end and the JSON format for data has led to a “JavaScript Everywhere” movement with Node.js at the center. Node.js offers developers an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that is perfect for high concurrency, low-latency applications that run across distributed devices. Its reactive architecture makes it an ideal technology for containerized microservices architectures you’ve been hearing so much about.

What does this mean for your enterprise? Where does it fit, and how can Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes help you use this technology?

Join this session for the answers. We’ll also demonstrate how quickly you can set up non-trivial enterprise-grade Node.js applications on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform. We’ll explore how to integrate with other open source technologies, such as Istio, and discuss strategies for your Node.js development and deployment pipeline, including canary and blue/green deployment strategies.

Register now and join the live presentation at 12 p.m. EDT, Thursday, April 19th. 

Session Agenda

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State of Functions-as-a-Service on Kubernetes (OpenShift Commons Briefing)

If you are interested in serverless computing / Functions-as-a-Service (FaaS), and are not following the OpenShift blog, you should checkout The State of Functions-as-a-Service on Kubernetes.  This video is part of the OpenShift Commons Briefing series, which has a lot of great content for developers who interested in cloud-native applications and microservices running on OpenShift and Kubernetes.

FaaS, or serverless as some call it, is a promising compute paradigm suitable for event-driven scenarios. In this briefing, Red Hat’s Michael Hausenblas and Brian Gracely reviewed the current open source offerings for FaaS on Kubernetes (Apache Open Whisk, kubeless, OpenFaaS, etc.) and discussed the pros and cons, on an architectural level and a user experience (UX) point of view. They also covered the topic FaaS vs. containers from a developers as well as an operators perspective.

This talk builds on material gathered by the Serverless Working Group , which is part of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). CNCF serves as the vendor-neutral home for many of the fastest-growing projects on GitHub, including Kubernetes, Prometheus, and Envoy.

Video, slides, and other resources:

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Bringing Coolstore Microservices to the Service Mesh: Part 2–Manual Injection

Coolstore+Istio Logo

In the first part of this series we explored the Istio project and how Red Hat is committed to and actively involved in the project and working to integrate it into Kubernetes and OpenShift to bring the benefits of a service mesh to our customers and the wider communities involved. If you want to play with Istio, check out the service mesh tutorials on learn.openshift.com. If you want to install it, follow the Istio Kubernetes quickstart instructions and install it on OpenShift 3.7 or later. Also don’t miss Don Schenck’s series of blogs on Istio technology in general to learn more about it and what Red Hat is doing in this space.

In this post, we will deploy the existing Coolstore microservices demo as a service mesh and start to demonstrate the tangible value you can get out of the system without any major rewrite or rearchitecture of the existing app. We’ll also improve our project along the way to adhere to Istio (and general microservice) best practices. In the real world, your applications and developers often make bad assumptions or fail to implement best practices, so with this information you can learn something about your own projects. For Coolstore, many of these workarounds will eventually find their way into the source code of the demo.

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An API Journey: From Idea to Deployment the Agile Way–Part I

The goal of this series of posts is to describe a proposed approach for an agile API delivery process. It will cover not only the development part but also the design, the tests, the delivery, and the management in production. You will learn how to use mocking to speed up development and break dependencies, use the contract-first approach for defining tests that will harden your implementation, protect the exposed API through a management gateway and, finally, secure deliveries using a CI/CD pipeline.

I coauthored this series with Nicolas Massé, who is also a Red Hatter. This series is based on our own real-life experience from our work with the Red Hat customers we’ve met, as well as from my previous position as SOA architect at a large insurance company. This series is a translation of a typical use case we run during workshops or events such as APIdays.

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