OpenShift 4

New features in Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.16.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.16.0.Final for Eclipse 2020-06

New features in Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.16.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.16.0.Final for Eclipse 2020-06

JBoss Tools 4.16.0 and Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.16 for Eclipse 4.16 (2020-06) are now available. For this release, we focused on improving Quarkus– and container-based development and fixing bugs. We also updated the Hibernate Tools runtime provider and Java Developer Tools (JDT) extensions, which are now compatible with Java 14. Additionally, we made many changes to platform views, dialogs, and toolbars in the user interface (UI).

This article is an overview of what’s new in JBoss Tools 4.16.0 and Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.16 for Eclipse 4.16 (2020-06).

Installation

First, let’s look at how to install these updates. CodeReady Studio (previously Red Hat Developer Studio) comes with everything pre-bundled in its installer. Simply download the installer from the Red Hat CodeReady Studio product page and run it as follows:

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Build a simple cloud-native change data capture pipeline

Build a simple cloud-native change data capture pipeline

Change data capture (CDC) is a well-established software design pattern for a system that monitors and captures data changes so that other software can respond to those events. Using KafkaConnect, along with Debezium Connectors and the Apache Camel Kafka Connector, we can build a configuration-driven data pipeline to bridge traditional data stores and new event-driven architectures.

This article walks through a simple example.

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How to run containerized workloads securely and at scale with Fedora CoreOS

How to run containerized workloads securely and at scale with Fedora CoreOS

The history of container-optimized operating systems is short but filled by a variety of proposals with different degrees of success. Along with CoreOS Container Linux, Red Hat sponsored the Project Atomic community, which is today the umbrella that holds many projects, from Fedora/CentOS/Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host to container tools (Buildah, skopeo, and others) and Fedora SilverBlue, an immutable OS for the desktop (more on the “immutable” term in the next sections).

When Red Hat acquired the San Francisco-based company CoreOS on January 2018 new perspectives opened. Red Hat Enterprise Linux CoreOS (RHCOS) was one of the first products of this merge, becoming the base operating system in OpenShift 4. Since Red Hat is focused on open source software, always striving to create and feed upstream communities, the Fedora ecosystem was the natural environment for the RHCOS-related upstream, Fedora CoreOS. Fedora CoreOS is based on the best parts of CoreOS Container Linux and Atomic Host, merging features and tools from both.

In this first article, I introduce Fedora CoreOS and explain why it is so important to developers and DevOps professionals. Throughout the rest of this series, I will dive into the details of setting up, using, and managing Fedora CoreOS.

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