OpenJDK 11

Migrating from Fabric8 Maven Plugin to Eclipse JKube 1.0.0

Migrating from Fabric8 Maven Plugin to Eclipse JKube 1.0.0

The recent release of Eclipse JKube 1.0.0 means that the Fabric8 Maven Plugin is no longer supported. If you are currently using the Fabric8 Maven Plugin, this article provides instructions for migrating to JKube instead. I will also explain the relationship between Eclipse JKube and the Fabric8 Maven Plugin (they’re the same thing) and introduce the highlights of the new Eclipse JKube 1.0.0 release. These migration instructions are for developers working on the Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift platforms.

Eclipse JKube is the Fabric8 Maven Plugin

Eclipse JKube and the Fabric8 Maven Plugin are one and the same. Eclipse JKube was first released in 2014 under the name of Fabric8 Maven Plugin. The development team changed the name when we pre-released Eclipse JKube 0.1.0 in December 2019. For more about the name change, see my recent introduction to Eclipse JKube. This article focuses on the migration path to JKube 1.0.0.

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Introducing the Red Hat build of the OpenJDK Universal Base Images—now in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.2

Introducing the Red Hat build of the OpenJDK Universal Base Images—now in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.2

With the recent release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.2, we also added the first Red Hat build of OpenJDK Universal Base Images. These General Availability (GA) images for OpenJDK 8 and OpenJDK 11 set a new baseline for anyone who wants to develop Java applications that run inside containers in a secure, stable, and tested manner.

In this article, we introduce the new OpenJDK Universal Base Images and explain their benefits for Java developers. Before we do that, let’s quickly review what we know about UBIs in general.

About Universal Base Images

Red Hat Universal Base Images (UBIs) are:

OCI-compliant container base operating system images with complementary runtime languages and packages that are freely redistributable. Like previous base images, they are built from portions of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). UBI images can be obtained from the Red Hat container catalog and be built and deployed anywhere.

In other words, UBIs help application developers reach the secure, stable, and portable world of containers. These images are accessible using well-known tools like Podman/Buildah and Docker. Red Hat Universal Base Images also allow users to build and distribute their own applications on top of enterprise-quality bits that are supportable on Red Hat OpenShift and Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

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Mandrel: A community distribution of GraalVM for the Red Hat build of Quarkus

Mandrel: A community distribution of GraalVM for the Red Hat build of Quarkus

The Java community has demonstrated time and time again its ability to evolve, improve, and adapt to meet the needs of its developers and users. Even after 25 years of language and framework choices, Java has consistently ranked in the top languages in use today due to its strong track record and capabilities in enterprise use cases. Red Hat has long been a strong leader in Java and open source software development and remains committed to being at the forefront of Java as it continues to evolve.

Today, Red Hat and the GraalVM community jointly established a new downstream distribution of GraalVM, called Mandrel. This distribution will power the Red Hat build of Quarkus, a recently announced addition to Red Hat Runtimes. This article explains what Mandrel is and why it is necessary.

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