OAuth

Use Red Hat OpenShift’s built-in OAuth server as an authentication provider in Open Liberty

Use Red Hat OpenShift’s built-in OAuth server as an authentication provider in Open Liberty

In Open Liberty 20.0.0.1, you can configure the Social Login feature to use Red Hat OpenShift’s OAuth server for authentication. In addition, there is a new MicroProfile Metric to measure CPU time, memory heap and response time. This release also offers faster application startups with Liberty annotation caching, and an updated JavaServer Face.

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Role-based access control behind a proxy in an OAuth access delegation

Role-based access control behind a proxy in an OAuth access delegation

In my previous article, I demonstrated the complete implementation for enabling OAuth-based authorization in NGINX with Keycloak, where NGINX acts as a relaying party for the authorization code grant. NGNIX can also act as a reverse proxy server for back-end applications (e.g., Tomcat, Open Liberty, WildFly, etc.), which can be hosted on an enterprise application server.

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Integrating third-party identity providers with Red Hat 3scale API Management

Integrating third-party identity providers with Red Hat 3scale API Management

This post describes how to configure OpenID Connect (OIDC) authentication using an external Identity Provider (IdP). With the new release of Red Hat 3scale API Management, version 2.3, it is possible to use any OIDC-compliant IdP during the API authentication phase. This is a very important new feature because it makes it possible to integrate any IdP already present in your environment—without having to use an Identity Broker—thus reducing overall complexity.

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Configuring NGINX for OAuth/OpenID Connect SSO with Keycloak/Red Hat SSO

Configuring NGINX for OAuth/OpenID Connect SSO with Keycloak/Red Hat SSO

In this article I cover configuring NGINX for OAuth-based Single Sign-On (SSO) using Keycloak/Red Hat SSO. This allows the use of OpenID Connect (OIDC) for federated identity. This configuration is helpful when NGINX is acting as a reverse-proxy server for a backend application server, for example, Tomcat or JBoss, where the authentication is to be performed by the web server.

In this setup, Keycloak will act as an authorization server in OAuth-based SSO and NGINX will be the relaying party.  We will be using lua-resty-openidc, which is a library for NGINX implementing the OpenID Connect relying party (RP) and/or the OAuth 2.0 resource server (RS) functionality.

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How Red Hat re-designed its Single Sign On (SSO) architecture, and why.

Red Hat, Inc. recently released the Red Hat SSO product, which is an enterprise application designed to provide federated authentication for web and mobile applications.

In the SAML world, RH SSO is known as an Identity Provider (IdP), meaning its role in life is to authenticate and authorize users for use in a federated identity management system. For example, it can be used to authenticate internal users against a corporate LDAP instance such that they can then access the corporate Google Docs domain.

Red Hat IT recently re-implemented our customer-facing authentication system, building the platform on Red Hat SSO. This system serves all Red Hat properties, including www.redhat.com and access.redhat.com — our previous IdP was a custom-built IdP using the JBoss EAP PicketLink framework.

While this worked for the original SAML use-case, our development teams were seeking an easier integration experience and support for OAuth and OpenID Connect protocols. Red Hat SSO comes out of the box with full SAML 2.0, OAuth 2.0 and OpenID Connect support.  Re-implementing the IdP from the ground-up gave us a chance to re-architect the solution, making the system much more performant and resilient.  While outages were never really acceptable in the past, our customers now expect 24/7 uptime.  This is especially true with Red Hat’s increased product suite, including hosted offerings such as OpenShift Online.

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