.NET Core

Using a local NuGet server with Red Hat OpenShift

Using a local NuGet server with Red Hat OpenShift

NuGet is the .NET package manager. By default, the .NET Core SDK will use packages from the nuget.org website.

In this article, you’ll learn how to deploy a NuGet server on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (RHOCP). We’ll use it as a caching server and see that it speeds up our builds. Before we get to that, we’ll explore some general NuGet concepts and see why it makes sense to use a local NuGet server.

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Using Kubernetes readiness and liveness probes for health checks with ASP.NET Core 2.2 on OpenShift

Using Kubernetes readiness and liveness probes for health checks with ASP.NET Core 2.2 on OpenShift

.NET Core 2.2 has been released. You can try it on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and OpenShift. One of the new features of ASP.NET Core is the Health Checks API.

In this article, which was written for C# Advent Calendar 2018, I show an example of how the API works with OpenShift by implementing two health checks for the Kubernetes liveness and readiness probes. Since OpenShift includes Kubernetes, this example also works well with Kubernetes.

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Building .NET Core container images using S2I

Building .NET Core container images using S2I

Red Hat OpenShift implements .NET Core support via a source-to-image (S2I) builder. In this article, we’ll take a closer look at how you can use that builder directly. Using S2I, you can build .NET Core application images without having to write custom build scripts or Dockerfiles. This can be useful on your development machine or as part of a CI/CD pipeline.

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Announcing .NET Core 2.2 for Red Hat Platforms

Announcing .NET Core 2.2 for Red Hat Platforms

We are very excited to announce the general availability of .NET Core 2.2 for Red Hat Enterprise Linux and OpenShift platforms! This general availability is in lock-step with Microsoft’s release yesterday.

.NET Core is the open-source, cross-platform .NET platform for building microservices. .NET Core is designed to provide the best performance at scale for applications that use microservices and containers. Libraries can be shared with other .NET platforms, such as .NET Framework (Windows) and Xamarin (mobile applications). With .NET Core you have the flexibility of building and deploying applications on Red Hat Enterprise Linux or in containers. Your container-based applications and microservices can easily be deployed to your choice of public or private clouds using Red Hat OpenShift. All of the features of OpenShift and Kubernetes for cloud deployments are available to you.

.NET Core 2.2 continues to broaden its support and tools for application development in an open source environment. The latest version of .NET Core includes the following improvements:

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Locating special folders in cross-platform .NET applications

Locating special folders in cross-platform .NET applications

.NET has APIs for locating special folders that can be used for application and user configuration and data storage. They provide a convenient, portable way to make cross-platform applications find the appropriate folders on different operating systems. We’ll look at how Environment.GetFolderPath, Path.GetTempPath, and Path.GetTempFileName behave on Linux.

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Securing .NET Core on OpenShift using HTTPS

Securing .NET Core on OpenShift using HTTPS

In an effort to improve security, browsers have become stricter in warning users about sites that aren’t properly secured with SSL/TLS. ASP.NET Core 2.1 has improved support for HTTPS. You can read more about these enhancements in Improvements to using HTTPS. In this blog post, we’ll look at how you can add HTTPS to your ASP.NET Core applications deployed on Red Hat OpenShift.

Before we get down to business, let’s recap some OpenShift vocabulary and HTTPS fundamentals. If you are familiar, you can skip over these sections.

OpenShift, pods, services, routes, and S2I

OpenShift is a Kubernetes-based open-source container application platform. A Kubernetes pod is a set of containers that must be deployed on the same host. In most cases, a pod consists of a single container. When we run the same application in several pods, a service does the load balancing across those pods. A route makes a service accessible externally via a hostname.

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Running Microsoft SQL Server on Red Hat OpenShift

Running Microsoft SQL Server on Red Hat OpenShift

In this blog post, we’ll set up Microsoft SQL Server on Red Hat OpenShift. We’ll use SQL Server to store data for a simple ASP.NET Core application running in a container deployed on OpenShift that manages a list of contacts. When we have that set up, we’ll use SQL Operation Studio to connect to the server running on OpenShift from our developer machine.

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Improving .NET Core Kestrel performance using a Linux-specific transport

Improving .NET Core Kestrel performance using a Linux-specific transport

ASP.NET Core is the web framework for .NET Core. Performance is a key feature. The stack is heavily optimized and continuously benchmarked. Kestrel is the name of the HTTP server. In this blog post, we’ll replace Kestrel’s networking layer with a Linux-specific implementation and benchmark it against the default out-of-the-box implementations. The TechEmpower web framework benchmarks are used to compare the network layer performance.

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