Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization on OpenShift: Part 3 – Data federation

Welcome to part 3 of Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization (JDV) running on OpenShift.

JDV is a lean, virtual data integration solution that unlocks trapped data and delivers it as easily consumable, unified, and actionable information. JDV makes data spread across physically diverse systems such as multiple databases, XML files, and Hadoop systems appear as a set of tables in a local database.

When deployed on OpenShift, JDV enables:

  1. Service enabling your data
  2. Bringing data from outside to inside the PaaS
  3. Breaking up monolithic data sources virtually for a microservices architecture

Together with the JDV for OpenShift image, we have made available several OpenShift templates that allow you to test and bootstrap JDV.

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Unlock your MariaDB/MySQL data with Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization

Welcome back to a new episode of the series: “Unlock your [….] data with Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization.” Through this blog series, we will look at how to connect Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization (JDV) to different and heterogenous data sources.

JDV is a lean, virtual data integration solution that unlocks trapped data and delivers it as easily consumable, unified, and actionable information. It makes data spread across physically diverse systems — such as multiple databases, XML files, and Hadoop systems — appear as a set of tables in a local database. By providing following functionality, JDV enables agile data use:

  1. Connect: Access data from multiple, heterogeneous data sources.
  2. Compose: Easily combine and transform data into reusable, business-friendly virtual data models and views.
  3. Consume: Make unified data easily consumable through open standards interfaces.

It hides complexities, like the true locations of data or the mechanisms required to access or merge it. Data becomes easier for developers and users to work with.

This post will guide you step-by-step how to connect JDV to a MariaDB/MySQL database using Teiid Designer. We will connect to a MariaDB 10.1 server using MySQL Connector/J 5.1, a JDBC driver for communicating with MariaDB/MySQL servers. Indeed, you can follow this same tutorial with a MySQL instance.

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Cockpit: Your entrypoint to the Containers Management World

Containers are one of the top trend today. Starting working or playing with them could be really hard also if you’ve well understood the theory at their base.

With this article I’ll try to show you some useful tips and tricks to start into containers world, thanks also to the great web interface provided by the Cockpit project.

cockpit--capture-15-cockpit-project-http___cockpit-project-org_

Cockpit overview

Cockpit is an interactive server admin interface.  You’ll find below some a of its great features:

  • Cockpit comes “out of the box” ready for the admin to interact with the system immediately, without installing stuff, configuring access controls, making choices, etc.
  • Cockpit has (as near as makes no difference) zero memory and process footprint on the server when not in use. The job of a server is not to show a pretty UI to admins, but to serve stuff to others. Cockpit starts on demand via socket activation and exits when not in use.
  • Cockpit does not take over your server in such a way that you can then only perform further configuration in Cockpit.
  • Cockpit itself does not have a predefined template or state for the server that it then imposes on the server. It is imperative configuration rather than declarative configuration.
  • Cockpit dynamically updates itself to reflect the current state of the server, within a time frame of a few seconds.
  • Cockpit is firewall friendly: it opens one port for browser connections: by default that is 9090.
  • Cockpit can look different on different operating systems, because it’s the UI for the OS, and not a external tool.
  • Cockpit is pluggable: it allows others to add additional UI pieces.

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Red Hat Software Collections 2.3 now beta

Today, Red Hat announced the beta availability of Red Hat Software Collections 2.3, Red Hat’s newest installment of open source web development tools, dynamic languages, and databases. Delivered on a separate lifecycle from Red Hat Enterprise Linux with a more frequent release cadence, Red Hat Software Collections bridges developer agility and production stability by helping to accelerate the creation of modern applications that can then be more confidently deployed into production.

New additions to Red Hat Software Collections 2.3 Beta include:

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Setting up a LAMP stack on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

You obviously know what a LAMP stack is if you’ve managed to find your way here, but for those who may be unsure, the key is in the name (L)inux (A)pache (M)ariaDB (P)HP—a term that has become synonymous around the globe for building a basic web server with database and PHP functionality. There are a myriad of web applications, ranging from WordPress to Joomla to Magento that all use this setup, and if you know how to get it up and running, then you’re off to a great start. It couldn’t be easier with RHEL, so let’s get started. MariaDB can also be exchanged for MySQL or a database of your choice.

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Database Docker images – now beta via Software Collections

“As a part of the Red Hat Software Collections offering, Red Hat provides a number of container images, which are based on the corresponding Software Collections. These include application, daemon, and database images. The provided images, currently available in the Beta version” (for more information see https://access.redhat.com/articles/1752723)

Red Hat Software Collections allows you to run newer versions of software on a stable Red Hat Enterprise Linux. These new images combine this feature with the benefits of containers.

In this post I would like to show you how to run database server from RHSCL in one command.

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