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Red Hat Summit: Lowering the risk of monolith to microservices

Christian Posta, Chief Architect at Red Hat, presented the story of a fictitious company1 moving a monolithic application to microservices.

When considering risk, we think we know the bad things that can happen and the probabilities of those bad things actually happening. Christian defines a monolith as a large application developed over many years by different teams that delivers proven business value while being very difficult to update and maintain. Its architecture, elegant at one point, has eroded over time. That makes it difficult to assess the risk of migrating a monolith.

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Red Hat Summit signage at Moscone South

Red Hat Summit: An Eventful Tour from Enterprise Integration to Serverless

Red Hat Senior Architects Marius Bogoevici and Christian Posta recently presented an overview of event-driven architecture, taking the audience from the basics of enterprise integration to microservices and serverless computing. Standing in front of a packed room at Red Hat Summit, their talk addressed four basic points:

  1. Event-driven architectures have been around for a while. What are they, why are they powerful, and why are back en vogue?
  2. Messaging is often used as a backbone for event-based distributed systems. What options do we have for cloud-native event-driven architectures?
  3. Integration is necessary for any organization. How do streaming, cloud-native architectures, and microservices fit in?
  4. Are Functions-as-a-Service (FaaS) the next utopian architecture? Where do functions fit in a world of microservices?

The entire session was done with three enterprise concerns in mind. First is the divide between agile systems and purpose-built systems. While the purpose-built system is optimized for a small set of use cases, it is very difficult to change if new use cases arise or the old use cases become irrelevant. We have to be agile to adapt to a constantly changing environment. Another concern is resource utilization. We want to eliminate waste and get the most out of our systems and resources, although the cloud in general and containers in particular make more distributed architectures practical. Finally, Christian made the observation that we cannot build complex systems from complex parts. The components we develop must be as simple and understandable as possible.

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Next DevNation Live: Serverless and Servicefull Applications: Where Microservices Complements Serverless, May 17th, 12pm EDT

Join us for the next online DevNation Live on May 17th at 12pm EDT for Serverless and Servicefull Applications: Where Microservices Complements Serverless hosted by Burr Sutter.  Serverless is a misnomer. Your future cloud-native applications will consist of both microservices and functions, wrapped in Linux containers, but in many cases where you, the developer, will be able to ignore the operational aspects of managing the infrastructure and even much of the runtime stack.

In this technical session, we will start by using Apache Whisk, a Functions-as-a-Service (FaaS) engine,  deployed on Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift to explore how you can complement cloud-native Java applications (microservices) with serverless functions. Next, we’ll open up a serverless web application architecture and deploy an API Gateway into the FaaS platform to examine the microservices talking to the serverless functions. We finish with a look at how event sinks and event sources map in the serverless world.

Register now and join the live presentation at 12pm EDT, Thursday, May 17th.

Session Agenda

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Moscone West graced with the Shadowman logo

Red Hat Summit: Containers, Microservices, and Serverless Computing

You’re in an IT department. How does the rest of the organization see you? As a valuable asset whose code and APIs make a difference in the marketplace, or as a necessary evil that should be trimmed as much as possible? Containers, microservices, and serverless computing can make you more responsive, flexible, and competitive, which in turn makes your organization more effective. And that puts you solidly in the asset column.

After sprinting through the streets of San Francisco from the stage of the opening keynote at Red Hat Summit 2018 (replay available here), Burr Sutter hosted a packed house in Moscone South to talk about these technologies. Containers are widely accepted (see the announcement from Red Hat and Microsoft for an example), microservices are increasingly popular as an approach to modernizing monolithic applications, and serverless computing is emerging as an important new programming model.

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Istio Service Mesh Blog Series Recap

The past nine weeks of blog posts have introduced, explained, and demonstrated some of the many features of the Istio service mesh when combined it is with Red Hat OpenShift and Kubernetes. This, the final post in this series, is a recap.

[This is part ten of my ten-part Introduction to Istio series. My previous article was Part 9: Istio Egress: Exit Through the Gift Shop.]

Week one was an introduction to the concept of a service mesh. The concept of a Kubernetes sidecar container was explained and diagrammed, and it was the beginning of a constant theme throughout the blog posts: You don’t have to change your source code.

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Eclipse Che’s Plans for 2018

 

2018 has been a busy year already, and we’re not even halfway through.  Eclipse Che 6 brought team and enterprise features including multi-user and multi-tenancy as well as a large number of other great capabilities (you can read all about it in our Che 6 release post).

We followed Che 6 GA with already 4 minor releases and the community worked hard in order to add even more capabilities:

  • Helm chart for Kubernetes deployment
  • C/C++ intellisense with integration of ClangD
  • Recover capabilities for OpenShift/Kubernetes
  • And almost 150 bug fixes

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Istio Egress: Exit Through the Gift Shop

Using Istio with Red Hat OpenShift and Kubernetes makes life with microservices easier. Tucked away inside of Kubernetes pods, using the Istio service mesh, your code can run (mostly) in isolation. Performance, ease-of-changes, tracing, and so on are made available by simply using the Istio sidecar container model. But what if you want your microservice to talk to another service that is outside of your OpenShift/Kubernetes/pods environment?

Enter Istio Egress.

[This is part nine of my ten-part Introduction to Istio series. My previous article was Part 8: Istio Smart Canary Launch: Easing into Production.]

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Red Hat Summit Spotlight: Getting Started with Cloud-Native Apps Lab

Cloud-native application development is the new paradigm for building applications and although is it often mistaken for microservices, it is much more than that and encompasses not only the application architecture but also the process through which applications are built, deployed, and managed.

New apps are often seen as the focus of cloud-native applications; however, we believe existing and new applications are alike and can incorporate cloud-native practices if they have the four defining characteristics of cloud-native applications:

  • Service-based: Build modular loosely coupled services (for example, microservices).
  • API-driven: Expose services via lightweight technology-agnostic APIs.
  • Containers: Package and deploy in containers as a portable unit of compute.
  • DevOps: Adopt agile and DevOps principles.

The Getting Started with Cloud-Native Apps lab at Red Hat Summit 2018, which takes place in San Francisco on May 8–10, has a packed agenda that focuses on walking participants through the principles of building and operating cloud-native applications.

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An API Journey: From Idea to Deployment the Agile Way–Part III

This is part III of a three-part series describing a proposed approach for an agile API lifecycle: from ideation to production deployment. If you missed it or need a refresher, please take some time to read part I and part II.

This series is coauthored with Nicolas Massé, also a Red Hatter, and it is based on our own real-life experiences from our work with the Red Hat customers we’ve met.

In part II, we discovered how ACME Inc. is taking an agile API journey for its new Beer Catalog API deployment. ACME set up modern techniques for continuously testing its API implementation within the continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD) pipeline. Let’s go now to securing the exposition.

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