Getting started with OpenShift Java S2I

Introduction

The OpenShift Java S2I image, which allows you to automatically build and deploy your Java microservices, has just been released and is now publicly available. This article describes how to get started with the Java S2I container image, but first let’s discuss why having a Java S2I image is so important.

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Announcing Fuse for agile integration on the cloud – FIS 2.0 release

Today, I am very pleased to announce the GA of Fuse Integration Service 2.0. This release will make integration applications more portable, flexible and allow agile developers to react faster to business needs by supporting microservice architectures. Developers will now be able to realize the benefits of microservices within integration projects and be able to leverage integration patterns while breaking up monolithic applications and reducing the size of services pushed onto older ESB technology.

With FIS 2.0, developers can now choose a more suitable technology for the composition and integration of microservices,  with a more lightweight runtime providing for faster deployment, while simplifying packaging and ensuring a smoother process from development to production, as well as allowing management of the distributed application and taking care of fault tolerance all at the same time.

The list goes on. The best thing about Fuse Integration Service 2.0 is that it can be used as a best-practice foundation for developers to focus on building business value in microservices without worrying about how they need to solve every problem on the list. And here is why…

Superior pattern-based solution for building and composing microservice  – The new FIS 2.0 comes with Apache Camel 2.18,  with 150+ built-in components and data transformation, it fits perfectly with the microservice principle of building smart endpoints. Developers can simply configure connectors to various systems and services.  

Enterprise Integration Patterns – are a new, best practice in the concept of agile integration; developers can compose microservices with ease (Simple pipeline), and simply reuse the pattern without reinventing each time.

Excellent developer experience with Fuse Tooling.   From getting started,  to real world production deployments, Fuse provides a comprehensive set of tools to help developers through the complete application life cycle. Developers can choose between traditional Java programming styles or leverage drag and drop features from tooling. Debugging and unit testing can also be done in the IDE with testing suite libraries. Maven is included for dependency and builds management.  For getting started, Fuse also provides a set of quick-start examples that simplify the learning curve but are also great for experienced developers wanting to rapidly prototype new projects.


Containerized applications – 
 FIS 2.0 offers a repeatable and declarative environment, allowing developers to quickly package an integration application into a container, simplifying the use of the same image in development, QA, and production environments.  Fuse has pre-defined a base image for the docker-like container, allowing developers to use it as a base for application logic after which it will generate images using the tooling provided. 


Support Spring Boot and Karaf runtime – 
FIS now officially supports Spring Boot,  a widely adopted environment for microservices.  Spring Boot’s “autowire” capability, and ability to create lightweight stand-alone applications has made it a natural fit as a microservice runtime. Karaf as an OSGi runtime is also supported for existing Fuse developers.

 

API Support and Service Resiliency – With REST DSL, developers can now define a REST endpoint within minutes and
automatically export the API documentation (Swagger). When connecting APIs, it is important to make sure to maintain service resiliency. Fuse Integration Service adopts Kubernetes as it’s orchestration layer for containers, which will detect any failure of the service and recover by spinning up another running instance. By supporting Hystrixs in Camel, Fuse makes sure the failure is isolated without affecting other instances. 

Complete CI/CD cycle – FIS 2.0 provides a great user experience for continuous integration with features in the IDE, Maven, source control with git and other SCM applications, and the source-to-image plugin helps developers build images either to test locally or for deploying into an actual cloud platform. The out-of-the-box pipeline support helps developers create a complete cycle for continuous delivery.

Container Orchestration – Last but not least, as the number of microservices grows, developers needed a way to manage and orchestrate all containers and services. Kubernetes in FIS 2.0 will help to automatically discover services, load balance incoming requests, handle clustering and dynamically configure services when they come alive. Operations can scale up and down services on-demand and manage resource as needed.

Of course, don’t worry if your application can not immediately jump to microservices,  Fuse can also support traditional ESB approaches. TRY IT  TODAY and get started with the agile integration experience!

 

 


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Download and learn more about Red Hat JBoss Fuse, an innovative modular, cloud-ready architecture, powerful management and automation, and world class developer productivity. It is Java™ EE 7 certified and features powerful, enterprise-grade features such as high availability clustering, distributed caching, messaging, transactions, and a full web services stack.

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An Incremental Path to Microservices

As a consultant for Red Hat, I have the privilege of seeing many customers. Some of them are working to find ways to split their applications in smaller chunks to implement the microservices architecture. I’m sure this trend is generalized even outside my own group of the customers.

There is undoubtedly hype around microservices. Some organizations are moving toward microservices because it’s a trend, rather than to achieve a clear and measurable objective.

In the process, these organizations are missing a few key points, and when we all awake from this microservices “hype”, some of these organizations will discover that they now have to take care of ten projects when before they had one, without any tangible gain.

To understand what it takes to reap real benefits from microservices, let’s look at how this neologism came to being.

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Microservices: Zero Downtime Deployment; Hot reconfiguration on OpenShift

2017: Time for a new resolution and the most important resolution for this year should be to adopt microservices to spend less effort on development and improve your time to market (TTM). Nowadays, there are plenty of tools and frameworks at the disposal of the discerning developer to rapidly build microservices. A few examples include Spring Boot, Vertx, etc.

Continue reading “Microservices: Zero Downtime Deployment; Hot reconfiguration on OpenShift”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 


Download and learn more about Red Hat JBoss Fuse, an innovative modular, cloud-ready architecture, powerful management and automation, and world class developer productivity. It is Java™ EE 7 certified and features powerful, enterprise-grade features such as high availability clustering, distributed caching, messaging, transactions, and a full web services stack.


For more information about Red Hat OpenShift and other related topics, visit: OpenShift, OpenShift Online.

Microservices Deployments Evolution

Microservices Are Here, to Stay

A few years back, most software systems had a monolithic architecture and slow release cycle. In the recent years, there is a clear move towards Microservices architecture, which is optimized for scalability, elasticity, failure, and speed of change. This trend has been further enforced by the adoption of cloud and containers, which also enabled practices such as DevOps.

Trends in the IT Industry

All these changes have resulted in a growing number of services to develop and an even bigger number of deployments to do. It soon became clear that the explosion in the number of deployments cannot be controlled using pre-microservices tools and techniques, and new ways have been born. In this article, we will see how Cloud Native platforms such as Kubernetes allow deployment of Microservices in high scale with minimal human intervention.

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Getting Started with Fuse Integration Service 2.0 Tech preview

To get started with FIS 2.0, for people who are just getting to know the technology, here is how I interpret it. Basically, it’s divided into two aspects.

1. Integration development: FIS uses Apache Camel as the core technology that creates, orchestrates, and composes microservices into a super lightweight thin integration layer, and becomes the API provider and service orchestrator through exposing RESTful or messaging service endpoints. And you can choose to either package and run it with Spring-Boot or Karaf.

2. Application Deployment and Management: FIS takes advantages of the OpenShift platform, and allows you to separately deploy the micro-integration service among a distributed environment, at the same time it takes care of the failover, high availability, load balancing and look up available services for you.

So, now we know what is in FIS 2.0, it’s time to take a closer look at how it is achieved, as a developer, you first need to decide to go with either Karaf (OSGi) or Spring-Boot framework, I personally prefer the Spring-Boot, because it matches closest to the microservice concept of a lighter deployment package. But it is up to you, the developer, after all, you are the god and creator of your application. After the framework is chosen, the developer will start developing the micro-integration services, composing between microservices or even use it to create a microservice. (With two frameworks, the development experience of the route itself is basically the same, by configuring camel components.)

Once the developer is ready to deploy the integration service, we can then decide how to deploy it onto the OpenShift platform. In FIS 2.0 there are two options, Binary S2i will build the entire application locally, and push it onto OpenShift, so OpenShift platform will use it to create and build the container image that it will run on, and for Source S2i, everything is build on top of OpenShift, so developer need to set the location of the source code in order for OpenShift to retrieve it to build the application and the container image.

And that is all. It is actually much more powerful, it’s hard to describe it in one go, dive into it, and you will soon find how fascinating the technology is, and how it can help you to resolve your current problems.

Here is a quick video that shows you how to get your first FIS 2.0 running.

The steps are as follows,

  • Install and start up OpenShift on your local machine 
  • Install FIS image stream definition into OpenShift (raw.githubusercontent.com/jboss-fuse/application-templates/application-templates-2.0.redhat-000026/fis-image-streams.json) 
  • In JBoss developer studio, create a Camel Spring-boot using the new archetype in FIS 2.0 
  • (Archetype catalog url: https://maven.repository.redhat.com/earlyaccess/all/io/fabric8/archetypes/archetypes-catalog/2.2.180.redhat-000004/archetypes-catalog-2.2.180.redhat-000004-archetype-catalog.xml)
  • Deploy to OpenShift using the Binary S2i tool (maven plugin)

 


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 


Download and learn more about Red Hat JBoss Fuse, an innovative modular, cloud-ready architecture, powerful management and automation, and world class developer productivity. It is Java™ EE 7 certified and features powerful, enterprise-grade features such as high availability clustering, distributed caching, messaging, transactions, and a full web services stack.


For more information about Red Hat OpenShift and other related topics, visit: OpenShift, OpenShift Online.

Spring Cloud for Microservices Compared to Kubernetes

Spring Cloud and Kubernetes both claim to be the best environment for developing and running Microservices, but they are both very different in nature and address different concerns. In this article we will look at how each platform is helping in delivering Microservice based architectures (MSA), in which areas they are good at, and how to take best of both worlds in order to succeed in the Microservices journey.

Background Story

Recently I read a great article about building Microservice Architectures With Spring Cloud and Docker by A. Lukyanchikov. If you haven’t read it, you should, as it gives a comprehensive overview of what it takes to create a simple Microservices based system using Spring Cloud. In order to build a scalable and resilient Microservices system that could grow to tens or hundreds of services, it must be centrally managed and governed with the help of a tool set that has extensive build time and run time capabilities. With Spring Cloud, that involves implementing both functional services (such as statistics service, account service and notification service) and supporting infrastructure services (such as log analysis, configuration server, service discovery, auth service). A diagram describing such a MSA using Spring Cloud is below:

365c0d94-eefa-11e5-90ad-9d74804ca412-2
MSA with Spring Cloud (by A. Lukyanchikov)

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Installing Red Hat Container Development Kit on Fedora

Fedora users seeking help on installing Container Development Kit (CDK), here is how you can install CDK 2.2 on your Fedora 24. These same steps can be used for CDK 2.3 too.

CDK provides a container development environment, to build production-grade applications, for use on OpenShift.

The installation of CDK 2.2 on Fedora essentially involves the following stages:

Setting up your virtualization environment
You need to first install the virtualization software, in this case, KVM/libvirt, and then proceed to install Vagrant and its additional plugins to enable the various features of CDK.

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For more information about Red Hat OpenShift and other related topics, visit: OpenShift, OpenShift Online.

Automating microservices deployment with Ansible

One of the main principles of microservices is to be independently deployable. As a consequence, Microservices development and operation tend to be much more complex than a Monolith because of their distributed nature — if your IT team has not moved out yet from its silos and has adopted DevOps practices, the operations team will not really understand why they have to deploy hundreds of independent software pieces in opposite to the “good old monolith”.

“You need a mature operations team to manage lots of services, which are being redeployed regularly”  (Microservices trade-offs by Martin Fowler).

The operations team and the software development team should work together adopting DevOps practices to avoid silos and deployment process where the software team throws the software over the wall.

Screenshot 2016-11-18 13.46.37.png

Ideally, each Microservices team is multifunctional and own the software artifact from conception to production. Given the multifunctional nature of these teams, “infrastructure as code (IaC)” and automation are now a necessity. DevOps teams share the knowledge of server provisioning, configuration management and deployment. There are several tools and approaches for IaC. As an example, I can mention Kubernetes, that allows you to define its objects as yaml or json files.

screenshot-2016-11-16-10-53-00

A couple months ago, I published a blog post that shows how to have your own (no-cost) microservices playground.  The focus of this material is educational. It provides instructions on how to deploy each microservice independently. However, some people would like to see all of them running running in few minutes.

To show how you can run this microservices playground environment in less than 20 minutes, I decided to record the following screencast that shows how to create an OpenShift cluster using “oc cluster up” (Check out “Four creative ways to create an OpenShift/Kubernetes dev environment“), and deploy all of them using Ansible.

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For more information about Red Hat OpenShift and other related topics, visit: OpenShift, OpenShift Online.

Microservices: Comparing DIY with Apache Camel

Microservices are currently enjoying immense popularity. It is rare to find a tech conference without at least a few mentions of them in corridor conversations or titles of talks, and for good reason: microservices can provide a path to better, more maintainable, higher quality software delivered faster. What’s not to love?

Of course there are the “negatives” and details in the implementation of microservices that can trip up even the most seasoned architect-developer, but at the same time we are collectively learning from mistakes and creating or reusing fantastic open source projects and products that can help smooth over those rough bits.

One such project is Apache Camel (and Fuse, its Red Hat-supported distribution.) Created way before the microservices revolution, Apache Camel was born to ease integration of disparate computing systems by implementing well-tested enterprise integration patterns (EIPs) and supplying a developer-friendly interface for writing code to do the integration.

Continue reading “Microservices: Comparing DIY with Apache Camel”


Join Red Hat Developers, a developer program for you to learn, share, and code faster – and get access to Red Hat software for your development.  The developer program and software are both free!

 


Download and learn more about Red Hat JBoss Fuse, an innovative modular, cloud-ready architecture, powerful management and automation, and world class developer productivity. It is Java™ EE 7 certified and features powerful, enterprise-grade features such as high availability clustering, distributed caching, messaging, transactions, and a full web services stack.


For more information about Red Hat OpenShift and other related topics, visit: OpenShift, OpenShift Online.