microservices

Containers, Kubernetes, and microservices: Start here

Containers, Kubernetes, and microservices: Start here

Although containers and Kubernetes and microservices seem to come up in every conversation, there’s a big chasm between talking about, demonstrating, and actually using a technology in production. Anyone can discuss containers, many people can demo them, but far fewer are successfully using containers and Kubernetes in a microservices architecture.

Why? There are likely many reasons, but a simple one may be that developers don’t know where to start.

Consider this series of articles your starting point. Relax, read on, and get ready to enter the exciting world of containers, Kubernetes, and microservices.

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Quarking Drools: How we turned a 13-year-old Java project into a first-class serverless component

Quarking Drools: How we turned a 13-year-old Java project into a first-class serverless component

“The question of whether a computer can think is no more interesting than the question of whether a submarine can swim.” (Edsger W. Dijkstra)

Rule-based artificial intelligence (AI) is often overlooked, possibly because people think it’s only useful in heavyweight enterprise software products. However, that’s not necessarily true. Simply put, a rule engine is just a piece of software that allows you to separate domain and business-specific constraint from the main application flow. We are part of the team developing and maintaining Drools—the world’s most popular open source rule engine and part of Red Hat—and, in this article, we will describe how we are changing Drools to make it part of the cloud and serverless revolution.

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Distributed microservices architecture: Istio, managed API gateways and, enterprise integration

Distributed microservices architecture: Istio, managed API gateways and, enterprise integration

The rise of microservices architectures drastically changed the software development landscape. In the past few years, we have seen a shift from centralized monoliths to distributed computing that benefits from cloud infrastructure. With distributed deployments, the adoption of microservices, and system scaling to cloud levels, new problems emerged, as well as new components that tried to solve the problems.

By now, you most likely have heard that the service mesh or Istio is here to save the day. However, you might be wondering how it fits with your current enterprise integration investments and API management initiatives. That is what I discuss in this article.

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Jumpstart your microservices development with MicroProfile Starter (Beta)

Jumpstart your microservices development with MicroProfile Starter (Beta)

In this article, I’ll give you a quick tour of how to use the new MicroProfile Starter (Beta) site to generate, download, and build a Maven-based MicroProfile project with just a few clicks. Using this online project generator, you choose the MicroProfile version and server (such as Thorntail) that you want your project to be based on. Then you’ll be able to choose what example code to include in your project to see how to use the APIs that are part of the MicroProfile specifications such as Config, Health Check, Metrics, CDI, and more.

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Full integration to Salesforce with Red Hat Integration (Part 2)

Full integration to Salesforce with Red Hat Integration (Part 2)

This article is the second in a series of three articles about Red Hat Integration. The first article described how the new Red Hat Integration bundle allows citizen integrators to quickly provide an API through tools that make creating an API in five simple steps effortless, and we implemented a demo showing the full API lifecycle on Red Hat Integration. The demo was about providing wine labeling and ranking info via APIs.

In this article, I am going to take you further by implementing a real business transaction with Salesforce. We will create an event-driven integration solution with no code on Red Hat Integration.

The idea of this demo is to receive an order from the client web application through a gated, secured API that will then process the order and forward the needed data to the corresponding Salesforce modules. From there, Salesforce will take care of the order content.

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Curse you choices! Kubernetes or Application Servers? (Part 3)

Curse you choices! Kubernetes or Application Servers? (Part 3)

This is the finale of a series on whether Kubernetes is the new Application Server. In this part I discuss the choice between Kubernetes, a traditional application server, and alternatives.  Such alternatives can be referred to as “Just enough Application Server”, like Thorntail. There are several articles on Thorntail (previously known as Wildfly Swarm) on the Red Hat Developer blog. A good introduction to Thorntail is in the 2.2 product announcement.

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Integration of storage services (part 6)

Integration of storage services (part 6)

In Part 5 this series, we looked into details that determine how your integration becomes the key to transforming your customer experience.

It started with laying out the process of how I’ve approached the use case by researching successful customer portfolio solutions as the basis for a generic architectural blueprint. Now it’s time to cover various blueprint details.

This article covers the final elements in the blueprint, storage services, which are fundamental to the generic architectural overview.

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Building a Node.js service using the API-first approach

Building a Node.js service using the API-first approach

Nowadays technology companies are adopting the API as one of the most valuable pieces of their business.

What does it mean when we talk about API-first development? We already know the benefits of using an API-first approach:

  • Reduced interdependencies
  • Earlier validation
  • Early feedback with the freedom to change
  • Improved efficiency

This article describes what it means to use the API-first design approach. It also walks through an example of using this approach with the OpenAPI Specification and with oas-tools as the Node.js back-end application, which enables you to care only about the business logic. All the validation of incoming requests are done by the oas-tools library (based on the OpenAPI Specification file provided).

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Integration of container platform essentials (Part 5)

Integration of container platform essentials (Part 5)

In Part 4 of this series, we looked into details that determine how your integration becomes the key to transforming your omnichannel customer experience.

It started with laying out the process of how I’ve approached the use case by researching successful customer portfolio solutions as the basis for a generic architectural blueprint. Now it’s time to cover more blueprint details.

This article discusses the core elements in the blueprint (container platform and microservices) that are crucial to the generic architectural overview.

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