Enabling Byteman Script with Red Hat JBoss Fuse and AMQ – Part 2

In my previous article, Enabling Byteman Script with Red Hat JBoss Fuse and AMQ – Part 1, we found a basic use-case for Byteman scripts with Red Hat JBoss Fuse or Red Hat JBoss AMQ. However, the log file was generated separately and only limited operations were possible. In this article I will show you how to use a Java helper class. By using Java, we get advanced operations to view or modify the content. Also, using java.util.logging allows us to log the statements to fuse.log, avoiding the creation of any other log file.

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Using Camel-Undertow component supporting http2 connection

This article would help to configure http2 protocol support for the camel-undertow component.

  • Camel’s undertow component use embedded undertow web-container of version undertow-core:jar:1.4.21. This version also supports the http2 connection.
  • I have used camel version 2.21.0-SNAPSHOT from upstream https://github.com/apache/camel.
  • Also, the curl version to test application using camel-undertow component is 7.53.1. This curl version supports –http2 flag for sending an http2 request.
  • I have also used nghttp to test application from linux terminal. However, this article is not about http2 insights.
  • For http2 details, I found articles [1] and [2] helpful.

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Red Hat Sessions at Devoxx 2017

The 2017 edition of the legendary Devoxx conference is over, and as always, it has been a fantastic week.

Hosted in Antwerp, Belgium, and sold out months in advance, it’s one of the top events of the Java community. Five days fully packed with workshops, regular conference sessions, BOFs, ignite sessions and even quickie talks during the lunch breaks – there was something for everyone.

The super-comfortable cinema seats at the Devoxx venue are legendary, but also if you couldn’t attend, you wouldn’t miss a thing as the sessions were live streamed. But it gets even better: all the recordings are freely available on YouTube already.

Red Hat was present with more than ten speakers, so Devoxx was a great opportunity for us to show the latest projects. Our sessions covered the full range of software development, from presenting a new garbage collector, over Java coding patterns and updates on popular libraries such as Hibernate, up to several talks related to microservices, including how to test, secure and deploy them on Kubernetes and OpenShift.

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A MicroProfile-based microservice on OpenShift Container Platform – Part 1

Creating a simple MicroProfile-based microservice and deploying it to OpenShift Container Platform

Eclipse MicroProfile is an open source specification for Enterprise Java microservices. It is a community of individuals, vendors, and organizations collaborating and working on innovative microservices patterns for Enterprise Java within the context of modern development, architectures, and underlying infrastructures, e.g. health checks, fault tolerance, metrics, and security propagation within a cloud environment. Its first release was based on 3 Java EE JSRs/libraries/APIs, but this does not necessarily mean that everything that Eclipse MicroProfile does will be Java EE-centric, some API specifications may end up just being part of MicroProfile, depending on the community itself and the spec leads for Java EE1. For example, the new release of Eclipse MicroProfile 1.1 includes the Config API, which is a non-Java-EE API. One of the goals of the Eclipse MicroProfile project is to innovate so its release schedule is agile compared to a standards body.

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Microservices Patterns With Envoy Proxy, Part III: Distributed Tracing

This blog is part of a series looking deeper at Envoy Proxy and  Istio.io and how it enables a more elegant way to connect and manage microservices. Follow me @christianposta to stay up with these blog post releases.

  • What is Envoy Proxy, how does it work?
  • How to implement some of the basic patterns with Envoy Proxy?
  • How Istio Mesh fits into this picture
  • How Istio Mesh works, and how it enables higher-order functionality across clusters with Envoy
  • How Istio Mesh auth works

Here’s the idea for the next couple of parts (will update the links as they’re published):

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Microservices Patterns With Envoy Proxy, Part II: Timeouts and Retries

This blog is part of a series looking deeper at Envoy Proxy and Istio.io and how it enables a more elegant way to connect and manage microservices. Follow me @christianposta to stay up with these blog post releases.

  • What is Envoy Proxy, how does it work?
  • How to implement some of the basic patterns with Envoy Proxy?
  • How Istio Mesh fits into this picture
  • How Istio Mesh works, and how it enables higher-order functionality across clusters with Envoy
  • How Istio Mesh auth works

Here’s the idea for the next couple of parts (will update the links as they’re published):

  • Circuit breakers (Part I)
  • Retries/Timeouts (Part II)
  • Distributed Tracing (Part III)
  • Metrics collection with Prometheus (Part IV)
  • Service Discovery (Part V)
  • The next parts will cover more of the client-side functionality (Request Shadowing, TLS, etc), just not sure which parts will be which yet 🙂 .

Continue reading “Microservices Patterns With Envoy Proxy, Part II: Timeouts and Retries”

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