messaging

Architecting messaging solutions with Apache ActiveMQ Artemis

Architecting messaging solutions with Apache ActiveMQ Artemis

As an architect in the Red Hat Consulting team, I’ve helped countless customers with their integration challenges over the last six years. Recently, I had a few consulting gigs around Red Hat AMQ 7 Broker (the enterprise version of Apache ActiveMQ Artemis), where the requirements and outcomes were similar. That similarity made me think that the whole requirement identification process and can be more structured and repeatable.

This guide is intended for sharing what I learned from these few gigs in an attempt to make the AMQ Broker architecting process, the resulting deployment topologies, and the expected effort more predictable—at least for the common use cases. As such, what follows will be useful for messaging and integration consultants and architects tasked with creating a messaging architecture for Apache Artemis, and other messaging solutions in general. This article focuses on Apache Artemis. It doesn’t cover Apache Kafka, Strimzi, Apache Qpid, EnMasse, or the EAP messaging system, which are all components of our Red Hat AMQ 7 product offering.

Continue reading “Architecting messaging solutions with Apache ActiveMQ Artemis”

Share
4 steps to set up the MQTT secure client for Red Hat AMQ 7.4 on OpenShift

4 steps to set up the MQTT secure client for Red Hat AMQ 7.4 on OpenShift

In this article, we show how to set up Red Hat AMQ 7.4 on Red Hat OpenShift. Also, we show how to connect the external Message Queuing Telemetry Transport (MQTT) secure client to the AMQ 7.4 platform. MQTT is a Java-based client that uses the Eclipse Paho library and can publish and consume messages from Red Hat AMQ 7.4 Broker on OpenShift using secure transport. These commands and code have been verified with OpenShift 3.11.

Continue reading “4 steps to set up the MQTT secure client for Red Hat AMQ 7.4 on OpenShift”

Share
Self-service messaging with Red Hat AMQ Online and GitOps

Self-service messaging with Red Hat AMQ Online and GitOps

This article explores the service model of Red Hat AMQ Online 1.1 and how it maps to a GitOps workflow for different teams in your organization. For more information on new features in AMQ Online 1.1, see the release notes.

AMQ Online is an operator of stateful messaging services running on Red Hat OpenShift. AMQ Online is built around the principle that the responsibility of operating the messaging service is separate from the tenants consuming it. The operations team in can manage the messaging infrastructure, while the development teams provision messaging in a self-service manner, just as if they were using a public cloud service.

Continue reading “Self-service messaging with Red Hat AMQ Online and GitOps”

Share
Announcing Kubernetes-native self-service messaging with Red Hat AMQ Online

Announcing Kubernetes-native self-service messaging with Red Hat AMQ Online

Microservices architecture is taking over software development discussions everywhere. More and more companies are adapting to develop microservices as the core of their new systems. However, when going beyond the “microservices 101” googled tutorial, required services communications become more and more complex. Scalable, distributed systems, container-native microservices, and serverless functions benefit from decoupled communications to access other dependent services. Asynchronous (non-blocking) direct or brokered interaction is usually referred to as messaging.

Continue reading “Announcing Kubernetes-native self-service messaging with Red Hat AMQ Online”

Share
How to integrate a remote Red Hat AMQ 7 cluster on Red Hat JBoss EAP 7

How to integrate a remote Red Hat AMQ 7 cluster on Red Hat JBoss EAP 7

It is very common in an integration landscape to have different components connected using a messaging system such as Red Hat AMQ 7 (RHAMQ 7). In this landscape, usually, there are JEE application servers, such as Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7 (JBoss EAP 7), to deploy and run applications connected to the messaging system.

This article describes in detail how to integrate a remote RHAMQ 7 cluster on a JBoss EAP 7 server, and it covers in detail the different configurations and components and some tips to improve your message-driven beans (MDBs) applications.

Continue reading “How to integrate a remote Red Hat AMQ 7 cluster on Red Hat JBoss EAP 7”

Share
Logging incoming and outgoing messages for Red Hat AMQ 7

Logging incoming and outgoing messages for Red Hat AMQ 7

In this article, I will discuss how to capture incoming and outgoing messages for Red Hat AMQ 7 (RHAMQ 7). This might advantageous if you need to log the incoming or outgoing traffic, or the messages from a broker, or during development and/or testing when you want to see all message. Additionally, There may also be a need to modify messages in transit. Using RHAMQ 7 interceptors, you can intercept traffic to and from the RHAMQ 7 broker. You can also modify messages using the interceptor.

Continue reading “Logging incoming and outgoing messages for Red Hat AMQ 7”

Share
How to integrate A-MQ 6.3 on Red Hat JBoss EAP 7

How to integrate A-MQ 6.3 on Red Hat JBoss EAP 7

This article describes in detail how to integrate Red Hat A-MQ 6.3 on Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) 7 and covers in detail the admin-object configuration, especially the pool-name configuration. The attribute pool-name for the admin-object explanation can lead to confusion. In this post, I will try to clarify many of the steps, give an overview of the components, and how they fit together.

The JBoss EAP requires the configuration of a resource adapter as a central component for integration with the A-MQ 6.3. In addition, the MDBs configuration on the EAP is required to enable the JMS consumers. On the A-MQ 6.3, the configuration of the Transport Connectors is required to open the communication channel with the EAP.

All the steps required to configure EAP 7 to use A-MQ 6.3 as an external JMS broker are described here:

Continue reading “How to integrate A-MQ 6.3 on Red Hat JBoss EAP 7”

Share
Setting up RBAC on Red Hat AMQ Broker

Setting up RBAC on Red Hat AMQ Broker

One thing that is common in the enterprise world, especially in highly regulated industries, is to have separation of duties. Role-based access controls (RBAC) have built-in support for separation of duties. Roles determine what operations a user can and cannot perform. This post provides an example of how to configure proper RBAC on top of Red Hat AMQ, a flexible, high-performance messaging platform based on the open source Apache ActiveMQ Artemis project.

In most of the cases, separation of duties on Red Hat AMQ can be divided into three primary roles:

  1. Administrator role, which will have all permissions
  2. Application role, which will have permission to publish, consume, or produce messages to a specific address, subscribe to topics or queues, or create and delete addresses.
  3. Operation role, which will have read-only permission via the web console or supported protocols

To implement those roles, Red Hat AMQ has several security features that need be configured, as described in the following sections.

Continue reading “Setting up RBAC on Red Hat AMQ Broker”

Share
Using the STOMP Protocol with Apache ActiveMQ Artemis Broker

Using the STOMP Protocol with Apache ActiveMQ Artemis Broker

In this article, we will use a Python-based messaging client to connect and subscribe to a topic with a durable subscription in the Apache ActiveMQ Artemis broker. We will use the text-based STOMP protocol to connect and subscribe to the broker. STOMP clients can communicate with any STOMP message broker to provide messaging interoperability among many languages, platforms, and brokers.

If you need to brush up on the difference between persistence and durability in messaging, check Mary Cochran’s article on developers.redhat.com/blog.

A similar process can be used with Red Hat AMQ 7. The broker in Red Hat AMQ 7 is based on the Apache ActiveMQ Artemis project. See the overview on developers.redhat.com for more information.

Continue reading “Using the STOMP Protocol with Apache ActiveMQ Artemis Broker”

Share
Monitoring Red Hat AMQ 7 with the jmxtrans Agent

Monitoring Red Hat AMQ 7 with the jmxtrans Agent

Monitoring Red Hat AMQ 7

Red Hat AMQ 7 includes some tools for monitoring the Red Hat AMQ broker. These tools allow you to get metrics about the performance and behavior of the broker and its resources. Metrics are very important for measuring performance and for identifying issues that are causing poor performance.

The following components are included for monitoring the Red Hat AMQ 7 broker:

  • Management web console that is based on Hawtio: This console includes some perspectives and dashboards for monitoring the most important components of the broker.
  • A Jolokia REST-like API: This provides full access to JMX beans through HTTP requests.
  • Red Hat JBoss Operation Network: This is an enterprise, Java-based administration and management platform for developing, testing, deploying, and monitoring Red Hat JBoss Middleware applications.

These tools are incredible and fully integrated with the original product. However, there are cases where Red Hat AMQ 7 is deployed in environments where other tools are used to monitor the broker, for example, jmxtrans.

Continue reading “Monitoring Red Hat AMQ 7 with the jmxtrans Agent”

Share