Memory Error Detection Using GCC

Introduction

GCC has a rich set of features designed to help detect many kinds of programming errors. Of particular interest are those that corrupt the memory of a running program and, in some cases, makes it vulnerable to security threats. Since 2006, GCC has provided a solution to detect and prevent a subset of buffer overflows in C and C++ programs. Although it is based on compiler technology, it’s best known under the name Fortify Source derived from the synonymous GNU C Library macro that controls the feature: _FORTIFY_SOURCE. GCC has changed and improved considerably since its 4.1 release in 2006, and with its ability to detect these sorts of errors. GCC 7, in particular, contains a number of enhancements that help detect several new kinds of programming errors in this area. This article provides a brief overview of these new features. For a comprehensive list of all major improvements in GCC 7, please see GCC 7 Changes document.

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Examining Huge Pages or Transparent Huge Pages performance

All modern processors use page-based mechanisms to translate the user-space processes virtual addresses into physical addresses for RAM. The pages are commonly 4KB in size and the processor can hold a limited number of virtual-to-physical address mappings in the Translation Lookaside Buffers (TLB). The number TLB entries ranges from tens to hundreds of mappings. This limits a processor to a few
megabytes of memory it can address without changing the TLB entries. When a virtual-to-physical address mapping is not in the TLB the processor must do an expensive computation to generate a new virtual-to-physical address mapping.

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