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Running an event-driven health management business process through a few scenarios: Part 1

Running an event-driven health management business process through a few scenarios: Part 1

In the previous series of articles, Designing an event-driven business process at scale: A health management example (which you need to read to fully understand this one), you designed and implemented an event-driven scalable business process for the population health management use case. Now, you will run this process through a few scenarios. In this way, you will:

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Speed up Maven builds in Tekton Pipelines

Speed up Maven builds in Tekton Pipelines

Tekton is an open source project that provides standard Kubernetes-style resources and building blocks for creating CI/CD pipelines that can run on any Kubernetes. Tekton does this by introducing a number of custom resource definitions (CRD) such as Pipeline, Task, and ClusterTask to provide a language and structure for defining delivery pipelines as shown in Figure 1. Tekton also provides a set of controllers that are responsible for running pipelines in pods on demand whenever a user creates an aforementioned resource.

Diagram of a Pipeline containing a Task workflow.

Figure 1: A Tekton pipeline contains a sequence of tasks.

The use of Tekton has grown rapidly over the last year. One of the frequently requested features is the ability to share artifacts between tasks in order to cache dependencies for build tools such as Maven and NPM. Although it was possible previously to use volumes in tasks, the release of Tekton 0.10 adds support for workspaces, which makes it easier for tasks within a pipeline to share artifacts using a persistent volume.

In this article, we look at how workspaces can be used to cache Maven dependencies in Java builds in order to remove the need to download dependencies for each build.

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Introduction to Eclipse JKube: Java tooling for Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift

Introduction to Eclipse JKube: Java tooling for Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift

We as Java developers are often busy working on our applications by optimizing application memory, speed, etc. In recent years, encapsulating our applications into lightweight, independent units called containers has become quite a trend, and almost every enterprise is trying to shift its infrastructure onto container technologies like Docker and Kubernetes.

Kubernetes is an open source system for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications, but it has a steep learning curve, and an application developer with no background in DevOps can find this system a bit overwhelming. In this article, I will talk about tools that can help when deploying your Maven applications to Kubernetes/Red Hat OpenShift.

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Building Java 11 and Gradle containers for OpenShift

Building Java 11 and Gradle containers for OpenShift

How do YOU get your Java apps running in a cloud?

First you grab a cloud from the sky by, for example,  (1) Getting started with a free account on Red Hat OpenShift Online, or (2) locally on your laptop using Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) or upstream Minishift on Windows, macOS, and Linux, or (3) using oc cluster up (only on Linux), or (4) by obtaining a login from someone running Red Hat OpenShift on a public or on-premises cloud. Then, you download the oc CLI client tool probably for Windows (and put it on your PATH). Then you select the Copy Login Command from the menu in the upper right corner under your name in the OpenShift Console’s UI, and you use, for example, the oc status command.

Great—now you just need to containerize your Java app. You could, of course, start to write your own Dockerfile, pick an appropriate container base image (and discuss Red Hat Enterprise Linux versus CentOS versus Fedora versus Ubuntu versus Debian versus Alpine with your co-workers; and, especially if you’re in an enterprise environment, figure out how to have that supported in production), figure out appropriate JVM startup parameters for a container, add monitoring, and so.

But perhaps what you really wanted to do today is…well, just get your Java app running in a cloud!

Read on to find an easier way.

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Use Groovy to customize the Maven build process

Use Groovy to customize the Maven build process

Apache Maven is a popular build automation tool used primarily for Java projects (although it can also be used to build and manage projects written in other languages). Maven uses a pom.xml file to centrally manage a project’s build and its dependencies. If you have worked anywhere near to the Java ecosystem chances are that, for the good or for the bad, you have come across the use of this tool.

Maven plugins are used to enhance and customize the Maven build process; while the list of existing plugins is quite extensive, it is common to need to implement some small changes or tweak the build just a bit, which makes writing a whole plugin feel like overkill.

This post describes a possible solution: the GMaven Plus plugin.

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Announcing release of Software Collections, Developer Toolset, new compilers

Announcing release of Software Collections, Developer Toolset, new compilers

I am pleased to announce the general availability of numerous Red Hat curated collections of the latest, stable application development tools, languages, compilers, databases, and more. Created for Red Hat Enterprise Linux, developers can access these via the following open source offerings:
  • Red Hat Software Collections
  • Red Hat Developer Toolset
  • New RHEL Compilers: Clang/LLVM, Go, and Rust

Components delivered as Linux Containers can also be used on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform.

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Red Hat updates Python, PHP, Node.js, more; supports new arches

Red Hat updates Python, PHP, Node.js, more; supports new arches

I am pleased to announce the immediate availability of Red Hat Software Collections 3.0 Beta, Red Hat’s newest installment of open source development tools, dynamic languages, databases, and more. Delivered on a separate lifecycle from Red Hat Enterprise Linux with a more frequent release cadence, Red Hat Software Collections bridges development agility and production stability by helping you create modern applications that can be confidently deployed into production. Most of these components are also available in Linux container image format to streamline microservices development.

In addition to these new components having traditional support for x86_64, Red Hat Software Collection 3.0 Beta adds support for three new architectures: s390x, aarch64, and ppc64le.

NEW ADDITIONS to Red Hat Software Collections 3.0 Beta include:

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Maven mirrors on OpenShift with and without Source to Image (S2I)

velocimetroI’m guessing if you’ve done enough repeated builds on OpenShift, using Maven, that you are probably aware of the “download the internet” phenomenon that plagues build times. You start a build, expecting all those Maven dependencies you downloaded for your last build to be re-used, but quickly see your network traffic ramp up while the same 100MB of jars are downloaded again and again. Even builds of a few minutes tend to grind on me, frustrate me as a developer when I’m trying to test/deploy/fix quickly.

Thankfully, Maven has a nice feature that allows you to set up local mirrors that cache dependencies and make them available to future builds, only updating from the upstream repo as needed on a regular (and configurable) schedule.

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Red Hat Software Collections 2.1 now generally available

Today, Red Hat announced the general availability of Red Hat Software Collections 2.1, Red Hat’s newest installment of open source web development tools, dynamic languages, and databases. Delivered on a separate lifecycle from Red Hat Enterprise Linux with a more frequent release cadence, Red Hat Software Collections bridges developer agility and production stability by helping to accelerate the creation of modern applications that can then be more confidently deployed into production.

Red Hat Software Collections 2.1 features several new and updated collections, including:

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Red Hat Software Collections 2 – now generally available

Red Hat Software Collections 2 – now generally available

Excellent news – Red Hat has announced the general availability of Red Hat Software Collections 2.softwarecollections-logo-colorful

You’ll see considerable additions to support multiple language versions. For example, it includes updates to “Python 2.7, continues to support Python 3.3 and also adds Python 3.4 – providing a fully-supported language library and blending developer agility with production stability.”

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