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Red Hat Software Collections 3.3 Beta: New and updated components

Red Hat Software Collections 3.3 Beta: New and updated components

Red Hat Software Collections supply the latest, stable versions of development tools for Red Hat Enterprise Linux via two release trains per year. We are pleased to introduce three new and two updated components in this release, Red Hat Software Collections 3.3 Beta.

The new components are:

  • Ruby 2.6
  • MariaDB 10.3 featuring a new MariaDB Connector for Java
  • Redis 5.0

The updated items include:

  • Two updates to Apache httpd
  • One update to HAProxy

See below for component details.

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How to set up a LAMP stack quickly on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta

How to set up a LAMP stack quickly on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta

Have you tried the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 (RHEL8) Beta yet? Read on to learn how to stand up a LAMP stack on top of RHEL8 Beta quickly, and play around with new features built into the operating system.

A LAMP stack is made up out of four main components, and some glue. The first main component in a LAMP stack is Linux. In my example, I’m using Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta for that, which gives me a secure operating system, a modern programming environment, and user-friendly set of tools to control it.

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Transitioning Red Hat SSO to a highly-available hybrid cloud deployment

Transitioning Red Hat SSO to a highly-available hybrid cloud deployment

About two years ago, Red Hat IT finished migrating our customer-facing authentication system to Red Hat Single Sign-On (Red Hat SSO). As a result, we were quite pleased with the performance and flexibility of the new platform. Due to some architectural decisions that were made in order to optimize for uptime using the technologies at our disposal, we were unable to take full advantage of Red Hat SSO’s robust feature set until now. This article describes how we’re now addressing database and session replication between global sites.

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Red Hat updates Python, PHP, Node.js, more; supports new arches

Red Hat updates Python, PHP, Node.js, more; supports new arches

I am pleased to announce the immediate availability of Red Hat Software Collections 3.0 Beta, Red Hat’s newest installment of open source development tools, dynamic languages, databases, and more. Delivered on a separate lifecycle from Red Hat Enterprise Linux with a more frequent release cadence, Red Hat Software Collections bridges development agility and production stability by helping you create modern applications that can be confidently deployed into production. Most of these components are also available in Linux container image format to streamline microservices development.

In addition to these new components having traditional support for x86_64, Red Hat Software Collection 3.0 Beta adds support for three new architectures: s390x, aarch64, and ppc64le.

NEW ADDITIONS to Red Hat Software Collections 3.0 Beta include:

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Unlock your MariaDB/MySQL data with Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization

Unlock your MariaDB/MySQL data with Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization

Welcome back to a new episode of the series: “Unlock your [….] data with Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization.” Through this blog series, we will look at how to connect Red Hat JBoss Data Virtualization (JDV) to different and heterogenous data sources.

JDV is a lean, virtual data integration solution that unlocks trapped data and delivers it as easily consumable, unified, and actionable information. It makes data spread across physically diverse systems — such as multiple databases, XML files, and Hadoop systems — appear as a set of tables in a local database. By providing following functionality, JDV enables agile data use:

  1. Connect: Access data from multiple, heterogeneous data sources.
  2. Compose: Easily combine and transform data into reusable, business-friendly virtual data models and views.
  3. Consume: Make unified data easily consumable through open standards interfaces.

It hides complexities, like the true locations of data or the mechanisms required to access or merge it. Data becomes easier for developers and users to work with.

This post will guide you step-by-step how to connect JDV to a MariaDB/MySQL database using Teiid Designer. We will connect to a MariaDB 10.1 server using MySQL Connector/J 5.1, a JDBC driver for communicating with MariaDB/MySQL servers. Indeed, you can follow this same tutorial with a MySQL instance.

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Setting up a LAMP stack on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

You obviously know what a LAMP stack is if you’ve managed to find your way here, but for those who may be unsure, the key is in the name (L)inux (A)pache (M)ariaDB (P)HP—a term that has become synonymous around the globe for building a basic web server with database and PHP functionality. There are a myriad of web applications, ranging from WordPress to Joomla to Magento that all use this setup, and if you know how to get it up and running, then you’re off to a great start. It couldn’t be easier with RHEL, so let’s get started. MariaDB can also be exchanged for MySQL or a database of your choice.

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Database Docker images – now beta via Software Collections

Database Docker images – now beta via Software Collections

“As a part of the Red Hat Software Collections offering, Red Hat provides a number of container images, which are based on the corresponding Software Collections. These include application, daemon, and database images. The provided images, currently available in the Beta version” (for more information see https://access.redhat.com/articles/1752723)

Red Hat Software Collections allows you to run newer versions of software on a stable Red Hat Enterprise Linux. These new images combine this feature with the benefits of containers.

In this post I would like to show you how to run database server from RHSCL in one command.

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Red Hat Software Collections 2.0 Docker images, Beta release

Red Hat Software Collections 2.0 Docker images, Beta release

I’m very happy to announce that Docker images based on collections from Red Hat Software Collections (RHSCL) 2.0 are in beta testing.  The images are available from the Red Hat Container Registry, and we’ve got the set of collections for language, databases and web servers covered – a complete list is below.

If you’ve not tried out the Docker package from RHEL7 Extras, you need to enable the Extras channel, install the docker page, and start the docker service; an extended guide for RHEL Docker is available here.  Once you are set up, pulling the RHSCL Docker images is very simple… for example, you can fetch the Python 3.4 image as follows:

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