Linux

Quickly set up a LAMP stack on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8

Quickly set up a LAMP stack on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8

Have you tried Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 (RHEL8) yet? Read on to learn how to quickly set up a LAMP stack on RHEL8 so you can play around with the new features built into the operating system.

A LAMP stack is made up of four main components and some glue. The first main component in a LAMP stack (the “L”) is Linux. In my example, I’m using Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 for that, which gives me a secure operating system, a modern programming environment, and a user-friendly set of tools to control it.

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Working with Red Hat Enterprise Linux Universal Base Images (UBI)

Working with Red Hat Enterprise Linux Universal Base Images (UBI)

If you’re like me—a developer who works with customers who rely on the tried-and-true Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), works with containerized applications, and also prefers to work with Fedora Linux as their desktop operating system—you’re excited by the announcement of the Universal Base Images (UBI). This article shows how UBI actually works, by building the container image for a simple PHP application.

With UBI, you can build and redistribute container images based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux without requiring a Red Hat subscription. Users of UBI-based container images do not need Red Hat subscriptions. No more extra work creating CentOS-based container images for your community projects or for your customers that prefer self-support.

I tested all these steps on my personal Fedora 29 system, and they should work on any Linux distribution. I am also a big fan of the new container tools such as Podman, which should be available to your favorite Linux distribution. If you are working on a Windows or MacOS system, you can replace the Podman commands with Docker.

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An introduction to Linux virtual interfaces: Tunnels

An introduction to Linux virtual interfaces: Tunnels

Linux has supported many kinds of tunnels, but new users may be confused by their differences and unsure which one is best suited for a given use case. In this article, I will give a brief introduction for commonly used tunnel interfaces in the Linux kernel. There is no code analysis, only a brief introduction to the interfaces and their usage on Linux. Anyone with a network background might be interested in this information. A list of tunnel interfaces, as well as help on specific tunnel configuration, can be obtained by issuing the iproute2 command ip link help.

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How to set up a LAMP stack quickly on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta

How to set up a LAMP stack quickly on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta

Have you tried the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 (RHEL8) Beta yet? Read on to learn how to stand up a LAMP stack on top of RHEL8 Beta quickly, and play around with new features built into the operating system.

A LAMP stack is made up out of four main components, and some glue. The first main component in a LAMP stack is Linux. In my example, I’m using Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta for that, which gives me a secure operating system, a modern programming environment, and user-friendly set of tools to control it.

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Using eXpress Data Path (XDP) maps in RHEL 8: Part 2

Using eXpress Data Path (XDP) maps in RHEL 8: Part 2

Diving into XDP

In the first part of this series on XDP, I introduced XDP and discussed the simplest possible example. Let’s now try to do something less trivial, exploring some more-advanced eBPF features—maps—and some common pitfalls.

XDP is available in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, which you can download and run now.

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Achieving high-performance, low-latency networking with XDP: Part I

Achieving high-performance, low-latency networking with XDP: Part I

XDP: From zero to 14 Mpps

In past years, the kernel community has been using different approaches in the quest for ever-increasing networking performance. While improvements have been measurable in several areas, a new wave of architecture-related security issues and related counter-measures has undone most of the gains, and purely in-kernel solutions for some packet-processing intensive workloads still lag behind the bypass solution, namely Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK), by almost an order of magnitude.

But the kernel community never sleeps (almost literally) and the holy grail of kernel-based networking performance has been found under the name of XDP: the eXpress Data Path. XDP is available in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, which you can download and run now.

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The Non-complexity of /etc/nsswitch.conf

The Non-complexity of /etc/nsswitch.conf

In most glibc-based operating systems, there’s a file /etc/nsswitch.conf that most people ignore, few people understand, but all people generally rely on. This file determines where the system finds things like host names, passwords, and protocol numbers. Does your company use LDAP? NIS? Plain files? The nsswitch file (it stands for “name services switch”) tells the system what service to use for each type of name lookup.

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How to manually copy SSH public keys to servers on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

How to manually copy SSH public keys to servers on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

We often use ssh-copy-id to copy ssh keys from our local Linux computers to RHEL servers in order to connect without typing in a password. This is not only for convenience; it enables you to script and automate tasks that involve remote machines.  Also, using ssh keys correctly is considered a best practice.  If you are conditioned to respond with your password every time you are prompted, you might not notice a prompt that isn’t legitimate (for example, spoofed).

What about when you can’t use ssh-copy-id or the target user ID doesn’t have a password (for example, an Ansible service user)? This article explains how to do it manually and avoid the common pitfall of forgetting to set the proper permissions.

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Introduction to Linux interfaces for virtual networking

Introduction to Linux interfaces for virtual networking

Linux has rich virtual networking capabilities that are used as basis for hosting VMs and containers, as well as cloud environments. In this post, I will give a brief introduction to all commonly used virtual network interface types. There is no code analysis, only a brief introduction to the interfaces and their usage on Linux. Anyone with a network background might be interested in this blog post. A list of interfaces can be obtained using the command ip link help.

This post covers the following frequently used interfaces and some interfaces that can be easily confused with one another:

After reading this article, you will know what these interfaces are, what’s the difference between them, when to use them, and how to create them.

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