language

How to Get Developers to Adopt Your Product

How to Get Developers to Adopt Your Product

Recently, I participated in a focus group where developers were asked to discuss how they make technology adoption decisions. Even “the big guys” seem unsure of how to get developers to notice and adopt their products. So, in this post, I’m going to try to reduce our learning and adoption process down to some concrete steps. The truth is, we don’t just pick up tools, components, libraries, or languages just to complete a particular task or project. In truth, any technology we adopt has to help us do one or more of three important jobs. The more of these jobs your product can do, the more likely developers will pick it up and stick with it.

Continue reading “How to Get Developers to Adopt Your Product”

Share
October 2016 ISO C Meeting Report

October 2016 ISO C Meeting Report

Trip Report: October 2016 WG14 Meeting

In October 2016, I attended the WG14 (C language committee) meeting in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The meeting was hosted by the Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT) at the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). We had 25 representatives from 18 organizations in attendance, including CERT, Cisco, IBM, INRIA, Intel, LDRA, Oracle, Perennial, Plum Hall, Siemens, and the University of Cambridge. It was a productive four days spent on two major areas:

  • Work on C11 defect reports aimed at the upcoming C11 Technical Corrigendum (TC) expected to be finalized in 2017. This will be the last revision of C11 to be published. The next revision of C will be a “major” version that is for the time being referred to as C2X.
  • Review of proposals for the next revision of C, C2X. To meet the TC 2017 schedule some C11 defects will have to be deferred to C2X. The C2X charter is in N2086.

Below is a list of some of the interesting C2X proposals the group discussed.

Continue reading “October 2016 ISO C Meeting Report”

Share

Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (June 2016, Oulu): Parallelism and Concurrency

Several Red Hat engineers recently attended the JTC1/SC22/WG21 C++ Standards Committee meetings in Oulu, Finland.  This post focuses on the sessions of SG1 (the standards committee sub-group 1 – for concurrency and parallelism) as well as on coroutines-related sessions. Jason already gave an overview of the meeting in his post.

SG1 prioritized proposals and issues affecting the (expected) C++17 standard, followed by proposals targeting the Concurrency TS or a future revision of the Parallelism TS.  We also made some progress in the space of coroutines.

Continue reading “Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (June 2016, Oulu): Parallelism and Concurrency”

Share

Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (March 2016): Parallelism, Concurrency, and Coroutines

Several Red Hat engineers recently attended the JTC1/SC22/WG21 C++ Standards Committee meetings in March 2016 in Jacksonville, Florida, USA.  This post focuses on the sessions of SG1 (the standards committee sub-group 1 – for concurrency and parallelism) and on several proposals related to coroutines.

The biggest news from a parallelism and concurrency (P&C) perspective is that the Parallelism Technical Specification v1 was voted into the working draft of the standard.

This means that C++17 will offer support for several parallel algorithms, provided that the standard is approved in the remaining stages of the ISO voting process. If approved, this will make utilizing parallelism easier for many users – e.g., a parallel “for-each” loop, as a simple example.

Several proposals for support of vector execution are also progressing, and I believe that they might be ready before version 2 of the Parallelism Technical Specification is published.

Continue reading “Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (March 2016): Parallelism, Concurrency, and Coroutines”

Share
Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (May 2015): Parallelism and Concurrency

Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (May 2015): Parallelism and Concurrency

gnu logoSeveral Red Hat engineers attended the JTC1/SC22/WG21 C++ Standards Committee meetings in May 2015 at Lenexa, Kansas, USA.  This post focuses on the sessions of SG1, the study group on parallelism and concurrency.

Finishing the Technical Specifications (TSes) was one major point on the agenda of SG1. The Parallelism TS (see this draft) and the Transactional Memory TS (see this draft) have been finalized for publication, and the Concurrency TS and has been made ready for a vote and feedback by the National Bodies. GCC does not yet support those TSes but already has the main functionality required by the Transactional Memory TS through implementing a previous specification of the language constructs for transactions. SG1 is continuing to adding features in those areas, but these will target a version 2 of each of these TSes.

Continue reading “Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (May 2015): Parallelism and Concurrency”

Share
Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (Nov 2014): Parallelism and Concurrency

Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (Nov 2014): Parallelism and Concurrency

gnu logoSeveral Red Hat engineers attended the JTC1/SC22/WG21 C++ Standards Committee meetings in November 2014 at Urbana-Champaign, IL, USA.  This post focuses on the sessions of SG1, the study group on parallelism and concurrency, which met for the whole week to discuss proposals and work on the technical specifications (TS) for both parallelism and concurrency.

SG1 mostly worked on finalizing the first revision of the Parallelism TS, and continued working on accepting proposals into the Concurrency TS. The Transactional Memory proposal is also making progress on becoming a TS.

Continue reading “Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (Nov 2014): Parallelism and Concurrency”

Share

Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (November 2014): Core

The Red Hat toolchain team was well-represented at the Fall 2014 meeting of the standardization committee (JTC1/SC22/WG21) in Urbana-Champaign, IL, USA. In this article, Jason Merrill summarizes the main highlights and developments of interest to Red Hat Enterprise Linux developers. Stay tuned for separate articles summarizing the library and concurrency working group aspects.

gnu logoThe fall meeting of WG21 (the C++ standardization committee) this year was hosted by the CS department at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.  This was the first meeting after ratification of the C++14 standard, and we weren’t changing the working paper while C++14 was out for voting ISO doesn’t allow changes to the working paper while there’s an open ballot, so there was a lot of leftover business from the last few meetings that was waiting to be voted on.

As usual, I spent the week in the Core Language Working Group.  We spent the majority of the week reviewing papers for new language features.

Continue reading “Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (November 2014): Core”

Share

Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (June 2014): Parallelism and Concurrency

Recently Red Hat sent several representatives to the JTC1/SC22/WG21 C++ Standards Committee meetings, which were held in June 2014 at the University of Applied Sciences in Rapperswil, Switzerland.

As in past ISO C++ meetings, SG1, the study group on parallelism and concurrency, met for the whole week to discuss proposals and work on the technical specifications (TS) for both parallelism and concurrency.

Continue reading “Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (June 2014): Parallelism and Concurrency”

Share

Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (February 2014)

Red Hat has actively participated in the ISO group defining the C++ standard for many years, and continues to make a significant contribution. The Red Hat toolchain team was well-represented at the February 2014 meeting of the standardization committee (JTC1/SC22/WG21) in Issaquah, WA, USA. In this article, Jason Merrill summarizes the main highlights and developments of interest to Red Hat’s customers and partners:

Continue reading “Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (February 2014)”

Share

Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting, Bristol, UK

Red Hat has actively participated in the ISO group defining the C++ standard for many years, and continues to make a significant contribution. The Red Hat toolchain team was well-represented at the spring meeting of the standardization committee (technically JTC1/SC22/WG21) in Bristol, UK, last month: we had three people there for the full week, with one other visiting a couple of times during the week. In this article, Jason Merrill summarizes the main highlights and developments of interest to Red Hat’s customers and partners:

Continue reading Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting, Bristol, UK

Share