KubeVirt

Using Multus and DataVolume in KubeVirt

Using Multus and DataVolume in KubeVirt

KubeVirt is a cloud-native virtual machine management framework based on Kubernetes. KubeVirt orchestrates workloads running on virtual machines in the same way that Kubernetes does for containers. KubeVirt has many features for managing the network, storage, images, and the virtual machine itself. This article focuses on two mechanisms for configuring network and storage requirements: Multus-CNI and CDI DataVolumes. You will learn how to configure these KubeVirt features for use cases that require high performance, security, and scalability.

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How to switch Red Hat OpenShift Virtualization from hardware virtualization to software emulation

How to switch Red Hat OpenShift Virtualization from hardware virtualization to software emulation

DISCLAIMER: The following setup is not supported by Red Hat, even for dev/test/sandbox environments. It is only meant to demonstrate the technical possibilities. See Configuring your cluster for OpenShift Virtualization for information. In addition, Tiny Code Generator (TCG) is not supported or tested by Red Hat.

OpenShift Virtualization is a feature of Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (OCP) and OpenShift Kubernetes Engine that allows you to run and manage virtual machine workloads alongside container workloads. Based on the open source project KubeVirt, the goal of OpenShift Virtualization is to help enterprises move from a VM-based infrastructure to a Kubernetes-and-container-based stack, one application at a time.

In my previous article, I showed you how to set up and enable OpenShift Virtualization running on Amazon Web Services Elastic Compute Cloud (AWS EC2). In that article, I noted that OpenShift Virtualization looks for hardware virtualization by default, which requires a bare-metal server instance. If you are running OpenShift on AWS EC2, as I do, then you have to enable software emulation over the default hardware virtualization. Otherwise, you need a bare-metal instance from the public cloud provider or a pure bare-metal solution.

In this article, I show you how to switch OpenShift Virtualization from its default of hardware virtualization to QEMU-based software emulation. You will then be able to start and operate a virtual machine through OpenShift Virtualization, even in a non-bare metal instance such as AWS EC2.

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Enable OpenShift Virtualization on Red Hat OpenShift

Enable OpenShift Virtualization on Red Hat OpenShift

Imagine an information technology (IT) world where everything is ideal: Every company has switched over to cloud-native applications, every application is containerized, everything is automated, and the IT people see that the world is good. Things are not so ideal in the real world, though, as we know. Applications remain tightly coupled with traditional virtual machine (VM) resources such as software libraries and hardware resources. The effort to migrate them from VMs to containers seems insurmountable, requiring years of dedicated spending and hours from developers and software architects.

The dilemma is that companies want all of their applications to eventually run on containers, but they also need to support applications running on VMs until that glorious shift happens. Given that application migration from VMs to containers will happen over the long haul, some companies are exploring a lift-and-shift approach. In theory, lift-and-shift would let us migrate tightly-coupled legacy applications to a container platform like Red Hat OpenShift. Rather than rewriting application code, developers would simply write interfaces (essentially, code with patterns) that are compatible with the existing structure.

Unfortunately, this scenario is unrealistic for legacy projects involving hundreds of application modules and packages. Therefore, it is logical to ask: What if there was a way to support existing applications running on virtual machines and new applications running on containers in one unified container-based platform?

Luckily, there is a way: Use a Kubernetes-based platform like OpenShift.

In this article, I introduce OpenShift Virtualization, a feature for Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (OCP). OpenShift Virtualization allows you to run and manage virtual-machine workloads alongside container workloads.

Note: As of version 2.4 when CNV went GA, Container-Native Virtualization was renamed OpenShift Virtualization.

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