kafka connect

Introduction to Strimzi: Apache Kafka on Kubernetes (KubeCon Europe 2020)

Introduction to Strimzi: Apache Kafka on Kubernetes (KubeCon Europe 2020)

Apache Kafka has emerged as the leading platform for building real-time data pipelines. Born as a messaging system, mainly for the publish/subscribe pattern, Kafka has established itself as a data-streaming platform for processing data in real-time. Today, Kafka is also heavily used for developing event-driven applications, enabling the services in your infrastructure to communicate with each other through events using Apache Kafka as the backbone. Meanwhile, cloud-native application development is gathering more traction thanks to Kubernetes.

Thanks to the abstraction layer provided by this platform, it’s easy to move your applications from running on bare metal to any cloud provider (AWS, Azure, GCP, IBM, and so on) enabling hybrid-cloud scenarios as well. But how do you move your Apache Kafka workloads to the cloud? It’s possible, but it’s not simple. You could learn all of the Apache Kafka tools for handling a cluster well enough to move your Kafka workloads to Kubernetes, or you could leverage the Kubernetes knowledge you already have using Strimzi.

Note: Strimzi will be represented at the virtual KubeCon Europe 2020 conference from 17-20 August 2020. See the end of the article for details.

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Extending Kafka connectivity with Apache Camel Kafka connectors

Extending Kafka connectivity with Apache Camel Kafka connectors

Apache Kafka is one of the most used pieces of software in modern application development because of its distributed nature, high throughput, and horizontal scalability. Every day more and more organizations are adopting Kafka as the central event bus for their event-driven architecture. As a result, more and more data flows through the cluster, making the connectivity requirements rise in priority for any backlog. For this reason, the Apache Camel community released the first iteration of Kafka Connect connectors for the purpose of easing the burden on development teams.

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Change data capture for microservices without writing any code

Change data capture for microservices without writing any code

Want to smoothly modernize your legacy and monolithic applications to microservices or cloud-native without writing any code? Through this demonstration, we show you how to achieve the following change data capture scenario between two microservices on Red Hat OpenShift using the combination of Syndesis, Strimzi, and Debezium.

architecture diagram

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Change data capture with Debezium: A simple how-to, Part 1

Change data capture with Debezium: A simple how-to, Part 1

One question always comes up as organizations moving towards being cloud-native, twelve-factor, and stateless: How do you get an organization’s data to these new applications? There are many different patterns out there, but one pattern we will look at today is change data capture. This post is a simple how-to on how to build out a change data capture solution using Debezium within an OpenShift environment. Future posts will also add to this and add additional capabilities.

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Capture database changes with Debezium Apache Kafka connectors

Capture database changes with Debezium Apache Kafka connectors

Change data capture, or CDC, is a well-established software design pattern for a system that monitors and captures the changes in data so that other software can respond to those changes. CDC captures row-level changes to database tables and passes corresponding change events to a data streaming bus. Applications can read these change event streams and access these change events in the order in which they occurred.

Thus, change data capture helps to bridge traditional data stores and new cloud-native event-driven architectures. Meanwhile, Debezium is a set of distributed services that captures row-level changes in databases so that applications can see and respond to those changes. This general availability (GA) release from Red Hat Integration includes the following Debezium connectors for Apache Kafka: MySQL Connector, PostgreSQL Connector, MongoDB Connector, and SQL Server Connector.

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Using secrets in Kafka Connect configuration

Using secrets in Kafka Connect configuration

Kafka Connect is an integration framework that is part of the Apache Kafka project. On Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift, you can deploy Kafka Connect using the Strimzi and Red Hat AMQ Streams Operators. Kafka Connect lets users run sink and source connectors. Source connectors are used to load data from an external system into Kafka. Sink connectors work the other way around and let you load data from Kafka into another external system. In most cases, the connectors need to authenticate when connecting to the other systems, so you will need to provide credentials as part of the connector’s configuration. This article shows you how you can use Kubernetes secrets to store the credentials and then use them in the connector’s configuration.

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