Jkube

Migrating from Fabric8 Maven Plugin to Eclipse JKube 1.0.0

Migrating from Fabric8 Maven Plugin to Eclipse JKube 1.0.0

The recent release of Eclipse JKube 1.0.0 means that the Fabric8 Maven Plugin is no longer supported. If you are currently using the Fabric8 Maven Plugin, this article provides instructions for migrating to JKube instead. I will also explain the relationship between Eclipse JKube and the Fabric8 Maven Plugin (they’re the same thing) and introduce the highlights of the new Eclipse JKube 1.0.0 release. These migration instructions are for developers working on the Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift platforms.

Eclipse JKube is the Fabric8 Maven Plugin

Eclipse JKube and the Fabric8 Maven Plugin are one and the same. Eclipse JKube was first released in 2014 under the name of Fabric8 Maven Plugin. The development team changed the name when we pre-released Eclipse JKube 0.1.0 in December 2019. For more about the name change, see my recent introduction to Eclipse JKube. This article focuses on the migration path to JKube 1.0.0.

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Cloud-native Java applications made easy: Eclipse JKube 1.0.0 now available

Cloud-native Java applications made easy: Eclipse JKube 1.0.0 now available

After nine months of incubation with the Eclipse Foundation, Eclipse JKube 1.0.0 is finally here. This release marks the final deprecation of the great Fabric8 Maven Plugin (FMP) project. JKube is a complete replacement of FMP and includes all of the major features. Projects relying on FMP to create Apache Maven Java containers should migrate to Eclipse JKube to take full advantage of the new features, bug fixes, and upstream project maintenance described in this article.

JKube is a collection of plugins plus a standalone Java library that fit into your Maven project. If you have a Java project that needs to get deployed into Kubernetes or Red Hat OpenShift, this is the right tool for you. JKube takes care of everything related to the cluster deployment while you, as a developer, get to concentrate on implementing your application without worrying about where it needs to be deployed.

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Introduction to Eclipse JKube: Java tooling for Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift

Introduction to Eclipse JKube: Java tooling for Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift

We as Java developers are often busy working on our applications by optimizing application memory, speed, etc. In recent years, encapsulating our applications into lightweight, independent units called containers has become quite a trend, and almost every enterprise is trying to shift its infrastructure onto container technologies like Docker and Kubernetes.

Kubernetes is an open source system for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications, but it has a steep learning curve, and an application developer with no background in DevOps can find this system a bit overwhelming. In this article, I will talk about tools that can help when deploying your Maven applications to Kubernetes/Red Hat OpenShift.

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