JIT compiler

Checkpointing Java from outside of Java

Checkpointing Java from outside of Java

When OpenJDK‘s Java virtual machine (JVM) runs a Java application, it loads a dozen or so classes before it starts the main class. It runs a method several hundred times before it invokes the optimizing compiler on that method. This preparation is a critical component of Java’s “write once, run anywhere” power, but it comes at the cost of long startup times.

Continue reading Checkpointing Java from outside of Java

Share
MIR: A lightweight JIT compiler project

MIR: A lightweight JIT compiler project

For the past three years, I’ve been participating in adding just-in-time compilation (JIT) to CRuby. Now, CRuby has the method-based just-in-time compiler (MJIT), which improves performance for non-input/output-bound programs.

The most popular approach to implementing a JIT is to use LLVM or GCC JIT interfaces, like ORC or LibGCCJIT. GCC and LLVM developers spend huge effort to implement the optimizations reliably, effectively, and to work on a lot of targets. Using LLVM or GCC to implement JIT, we can just utilize these optimizations for free. Using the existing compilers was the only way to get JIT for CRuby in the short time before the Ruby 3.0 release, which has the goal of improving CRuby performance by three times.

So, CRuby MJIT utilizes GCC or LLVM, but what is unique about this JIT?

Continue reading “MIR: A lightweight JIT compiler project”

Share