JDK 11

Using Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit to see the impact of migrating to OpenJDK

Using Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit to see the impact of migrating to OpenJDK

Migrating from one software solution to another is a reality that all good software developers need to plan for. Having a plan helps to drive innovation at a continuous pace, whether you are developing software for in-house use or you are acquiring software from a vendor. In either case, never anticipating or planning for migration endangers the entire innovation value proposition. And in today’s ever-changing world of software, everyone who wants to benefit from the success of the cloud has to ensure that cloud innovation is continuous. Therefore, maintaining a stack that is changing along with technological advancements is a necessity.

In this article, we will take a look at the impact of moving to OpenJDK and the results will aid in drawing further conclusions and in planning. It’s quite common to be using a proprietary version of JDK, and this article addresses how to use Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit to analyze your codebase to understand the impact of migrating to OpenJDK.

Continue reading “Using Red Hat Application Migration Toolkit to see the impact of migrating to OpenJDK”

Share
The future of Java and OpenJDK updates without Oracle support

The future of Java and OpenJDK updates without Oracle support

Oracle recently announced that it would no longer supply free (as in beer) binary downloads for JDK releases after a six-month period, and neither would Oracle engineers write patches for OpenJDK bugs after that period. This has caused a great deal of concern among some Java users.

From my point of view, this is little more than business as usual. Several years ago, the OpenJDK 6 updates (jdk6u) project was relinquished by Oracle and I assumed leadership, and then the same happened with OpenJDK 7. Subsequently, Andrew Brygin of Azul took over the leadership of OpenJDK 6. The OpenJDK Vulnerability Group, with members from many organizations, collaborates on critical security issues. With the help of the wider OpenJDK community and my team at Red Hat, we have continued to provide updates for critical bugs and security vulnerabilities at regular intervals. I can see no reason why this process should not work in the same way for OpenJDK 8 and the next long-term support release, OpenJDK 11.

Continue reading “The future of Java and OpenJDK updates without Oracle support”

Share