jBPM

Troubleshooting user task errors in Red Hat Process Automation Manager and Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite

Troubleshooting user task errors in Red Hat Process Automation Manager and Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite

I’ve been around Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite (jBPM) and Red Hat Process Automation Manager (RHPAM) for many years. Over that time, I’ve learned a lot about the lesser-known aspects of this business process management engine.

If you are like most people, you might believe that user tasks are trivial, and learning about their details is unnecessary. Then, one day, you will find yourself troubleshooting an error like this one:

User '[User:'admin']' was unable to execution operation 'Start' on task id 287271 due to a no 'current status' match.

Receiving one too many similar error messages led me to learn everything that I know about user tasks, and I have decided to share my experience.

User tasks are a vital part of any business process management engine, jBPM included. Their behavior is defined by the OASIS Web Services—Human Task Specification, which has been fully adopted by Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) 2.0—the standard for business processes diagrams. The spec defines two exceptionally important things that I will discuss in this article: The user task lifecycle and task access control. Without further ado, let’s jump right in.

Note: These troubleshooting tips are applicable to Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite 6.2 and above and Red Hat Process Automation Manager 7.

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Automated API testing for the KIE Server

Automated API testing for the KIE Server

In software development, much has been said about testing and there are many ways to think about it. In the context of agility and DevOps, automated testing is considered a foundation for the principles of flow and fast feedback. Considering the implementation of jBPM and Drools within a software delivery project, it becomes natural to think about how to support reliable automated testing for both stages of development and continuous integration.

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Red Hat Process Automation 7.7 brings updates, fixes, and tech previews

Red Hat Process Automation 7.7 brings updates, fixes, and tech previews

Red Hat Process Automation Manager (RHPAM) and Red Hat Decision Manager (RHDM) 7.7 bring features for the authoring of processes, rules, testing, execution, and cloud scenarios. Besides these new features, usability, and performance improvements, version 7.7 also brings more than 120 bug fixes. These updates are part of the Middleware Business Automation stack Red Hat released on March 18th.

Let’s take a look at what’s new.

Business Central: Squash commits and merge

The Business Central authoring environment by default commits at every change. Business Central now includes the option to squash commits when working with pull requests and teams collaboration through business central, as shown in Figure 1.

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Running an event-driven health management business process through end user scenarios: Part 2

Running an event-driven health management business process through end user scenarios: Part 2

If you read the first article in this series, then you already set up the example application you’ll need for this article. If you have not set up the population health management application, you should do that before continuing. In this article, we’ll run a few business processes through our event- and business-process-driven application to test it out.

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Running an event-driven health management business process through a few scenarios: Part 1

Running an event-driven health management business process through a few scenarios: Part 1

In the previous series of articles, Designing an event-driven business process at scale: A health management example (which you need to read to fully understand this one), you designed and implemented an event-driven scalable business process for the population health management use case. Now, you will run this process through a few scenarios. In this way, you will:

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Designing an event-driven process at scale: Part 3

Designing an event-driven process at scale: Part 3

In the first article in this series, Designing an event-driven business process at scale: A health management example, Part 1, you found the business use case and data model for a concrete example from the health management industry. You then began implementing the example in jBPM (an open source business automation suite) by creating the Trigger process.

In the second article, you implemented the Task subprocess and, among other things, you also configured the call parameters for the Reminder and Escalation subprocesses within the Task subprocess. Now you will implement these subprocesses.

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Designing an event-driven process at scale: Part 2

Designing an event-driven process at scale: Part 2

In the first article in this series, Designing an event-driven business process at scale: A health management example, Part 1, we began by defining the business use case and data model for a concrete example from the health management industry. We then began implementing the example in jBPM (an open source business automation suite) by creating our trigger process.

Now, in the second article in this series, we will focus on creating the Task subprocess and its many components. In our case, these are:

  • The Expired? gate
  • The Suppressed? gate
  • The human task
  • The Reminder subprocess
  • The “What type of close?” gate
  • The Hard Close embedded subprocess
  • The Escalation subprocess

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Designing an event-driven business process at scale: A health management example, Part 1

Designing an event-driven business process at scale: A health management example, Part 1

The concept of a business process (BP), or workflow (WF), and the discipline and practice of business process management (BPM) have been around since the early 90s. Since then, WF/BPM tools have evolved considerably. More recently, a convergence of different tools has taken place, adding decision management (DM) and case management (CM) to the mix. The ascendance of data science, machine learning, and artificial intelligence in the last few years has further complicated the picture. The mature field of BPM has been subsumed into the hyped pseudo-novelties of digital business automation, digital reinvention, digital everything, etc., with the addition of “low code” and robotic process automation (RPA).

A common requirement of business applications today is to be event-driven; that is, specific events should trigger a workflow or decision in real-time. This requirement leads to a fundamental problem. In realistic situations, there are many different types of events, each one requiring specific handling. An event-driven business application may have hundreds of qualitatively different workflows or processes. As new types of events arise in today’s ever-changing business conditions, new processes have to be designed and deployed as quickly as possible.

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Kogito for Quarkus intelligent applications

Kogito for Quarkus intelligent applications

The Quarkus project is becoming quite popular among developers. Quarkus provides a fast-dev environment, and it has already a set of libraries, standards, and frameworks that are made available through extensions like RestEasy, Panache, SmallRye, Keycloak, and Kafka. Additionally, you can start using Kogito today to create intelligent Quarkus applications.

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