JBoss Data Grid

Using Red Hat Data Grid to power a multi-cloud real-time game

Using Red Hat Data Grid to power a multi-cloud real-time game

The scavenger hunt game developed for the audience to play during the Red Hat Summit 2018 demo used Red Hat Data Grid as storage for everything except the pictures taken by the participants. Data was stored across three different cloud environments using cross-site replication. In this blog post, we will look at how data was flowing through Data Grid and explain the Data Grid features powering different aspects of the game’s functionality.

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Red Hat Data Grid on Three Clouds (the details behind the demo)

Red Hat Data Grid on Three Clouds (the details behind the demo)

If you saw or heard about the multi-cloud demo at Red Hat Summit 2018, this article details how we ran Red Hat Data Grid in active-active-active mode across three cloud providers. This set up enabled us to show a fail over between cloud providers in real time with no loss of data. In addition to Red Hat Data Grid, we used Vert.x (reactive programming), OpenWhisk (serverless), and Red Hat Gluster Storage (software-defined storage.)

This year’s Red Hat Summit was quite an adventure for all of us. A trip to San Francisco is probably on the bucket list of IT geeks from all over the world. Also, we were able to meet many other Red Hatters, who work remotely for Red Hat as we do.  However, the best part was that we had something important to say: “we believe in the hybrid/multi cloud” and we got to prove that live on stage.

Photo credit: Bolesław Dawidowicz

 

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Externalized HTTP Session in an OpenShift 3.9 Environment

Externalized HTTP Session in an OpenShift 3.9 Environment

In this article, I will show how you can implement a common use case that often happens when you migrate a classic Java EE application into a Red Hat OpenShift environment.

Scenario

Usually a classic Java EE application stores a user’s information, such the profile’s configuration, in the HTTP session. In a typical production scenario, there are several application server instances that build a cluster and are used to implement high availability, failover, and load balancing. To make sure that stateful information is preserved across the application server instances, you must distribute your session as described in the Java EE 7 specification section EE.6.4, “Servlet 3.1 Requirements.”

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Red Hat Summit 2018: Learn how other developers are producing cloud-native applications

Red Hat Summit 2018: Learn how other developers are producing cloud-native applications

Want insights into how other organizations are building cloud-native applications and microservices? At Red Hat Summit 2018, developers from a number of different companies will be sharing their stories in break-out sessions, lightning talks, and birds-of-a-feather discussions.  Learn how they solved real business problems using containers, microservices, API management, integration services, and other middleware.

Join us at Red Hat Summit 2018, to hear speakers from Bell Canada, BMW, BP, Deutsche Bank, InComm, Sabre, SIA, Swiss Railways, USAA, and many more.

Session Highlights:

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Implementing a Log Collector using Red Hat JBoss Fuse and Red Hat JBoss Data Grid

Implementing a Log Collector using Red Hat JBoss Fuse and Red Hat JBoss Data Grid

Most of the time, when we think about collecting, parsing and storing Logs, the first thing that pops in our mind is the ElasticStack or ELK. It is well positioned in developer and sysadmin’s minds. The stack combines the popular Elasticsearch, Logstash and Kibana projects together to easy the collection/aggregation, store, and visualization of application logs. As an Apache Camel rider and Infinispan enthusiast, I prepared this exercise to produce my own log collector and store stack using Red Hat’s products, JBoss Fuse and JBoss Data Grid, instead.

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Enabling LDAP Security for DataGrid Cache

Enabling LDAP Security for DataGrid Cache

Expanding on Tristan’s blog, where he spoke of enabling security for JBoss Data Grid caches, in this post we will cover how to add LDAP based security to the JDG caches. The principles and techniques remain defined by Tristan, but there are some minor changes that I will be highlighting in this blog for a successful working configuration of JDG enabled with LDAP security.

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