How to Debug Your Node.js Application on OpenShift with Chrome DevTools

Recently, I wrote a post called Zero to Express on OpenShift in Three Commands, which shows how to get started using Node.js, Express, and OpenShift together as fast as possible using the Node.js s2i (source-to-image) images that were recently released as part of Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR).

This post will add to the last one and show how we can start to debug and inspect our running code using the Chrome Developer Tools (DevTools) inspector.

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Next DevNation Live: Enterprise Node.js on OpenShift, April 19th, 12 p.m. EDT

The next online DevNation Live Tech Talk is Thursday, April 19th at 12pm EDT. The topic is “Enterprise Node.js on Red Hat OpenShift” presented by Lance Ball, and hosted by Burr Sutter. The popularity of JavaScript on the front end and the JSON format for data has led to a “JavaScript Everywhere” movement with Node.js at the center. Node.js offers developers an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that is perfect for high concurrency, low-latency applications that run across distributed devices. Its reactive architecture makes it an ideal technology for containerized microservices architectures you’ve been hearing so much about.

What does this mean for your enterprise? Where does it fit, and how can Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes help you use this technology?

Join this session for the answers. We’ll also demonstrate how quickly you can set up non-trivial enterprise-grade Node.js applications on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform. We’ll explore how to integrate with other open source technologies, such as Istio, and discuss strategies for your Node.js development and deployment pipeline, including canary and blue/green deployment strategies.

Register now and join the live presentation at 12 p.m. EDT, Thursday, April 19th. 

Session Agenda

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Announcing: Node.js General Availability in Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

Node.js Foundation Logo

Summary

Today Red Hat is making Node.js generally available to Red Hat customers through a subscription to Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes (RHOAR). RHOAR provides application developers with a variety of application runtimes running on the OpenShift Container Platform.

Node.js is based on the V8 JavaScript engine and allows you to write server-side JavaScript applications. Node.js joins the existing set of supported runtimes and offers developers an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.

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3scale ActiveDocs and OAuth 2.0

This guide is designed to help you integrate your Red Hat Single Sign-On server with the OpenAPI (OAI)-based ActiveDocs in your 3scale developer portal. Although it has only been implemented with this particular Identity & Access Management solution (IAM), you could in theory make some customizations where necessary to integrate with another OpenID Connect-based solution.

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Whisking Functions with Promises using OpenWhisk

Over the past few weeks I have been learning and enhancing my skills around the new buzz word “serverless” and trying to understand what this buzz is all about.  As an ardent open-source developer, I was looking for a platform where I can develop and deploy the serverless functions, which is when I stumbled upon Apache OpenWhisk.

In this blog I will demonstrate how to build a simple nodejs function that can do reverse geocoding using Google Maps API, and how to deploy the functions on to Apache OpenWhisk.

The context is to show building an Apache OpenWhisk JavaScript action, which involves a callback.  As most of us are familiar with Google Maps API (which has lots of callbacks), it provides a good example for this blog.

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Best practices with React and Redux web application development

Introduction

In the past year, our team has re-written one of our internal apps from Angular to React. While earlier React experience on the team ranged from new to experienced, we learned a lot along this journey. Much of what we learned has been from experiencing pain points in development, or inefficiencies, and either researching others’ best practices or experimenting with what works best for us.

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