Java 8

Announcing Red Hat Developer Studio 12.9.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.9.0.Final for Eclipse 2018-09

Announcing Red Hat Developer Studio 12.9.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.9.0.Final for Eclipse 2018-09

Attention desktop IDE users: Red Hat Developer Studio 12.9 and the community edition, JBoss Tools 4.9.0 for Eclipse 2018-09, are now available. You can download the Developer Studio bundled installer, which installs Eclipse 4.9 with all of the JBoss Tools already configured. Or, if you have an existing Eclipse 4.9 (2018-09) installation, you can download the JBoss Tools package.

This article highlights some of the new features in both JBoss Tools and Eclipse Photon, covering WildFly, Spring Boot, Camel, Maven, and many Java-related improvements—including full Java 11 support.

Developer Studio/JBoss Tools provides a desktop IDE with a broad set of tooling covering multiple programming models and frameworks. If you are doing container/cloud development, there is integrated functionality for working with Red Hat OpenShift, Kubernetes, Red Hat Container Development Kit, and Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes. For integration projects, there is tooling covering Camel and Red Hat Fuse that can be used in both local and cloud deployments.

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Announcing Red Hat Developer Studio 12.0.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.6.0.Final for Eclipse Photon

Announcing Red Hat Developer Studio 12.0.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.6.0.Final for Eclipse Photon

Attention desktop IDE users: Red Hat Developer Studio 12.0 and the community edition, JBoss Tools 4.6.0 for Eclipse Photon, are now available. You can download a bundled installer, Developer Studio, which installs Eclipse 4.8 with all of the JBoss Tools already configured. Or, if you have an existing Eclipse 4.8 (Photon) installation, you can download the JBoss Tools package. This article highlights some of the new features in both JBoss Tools and Eclipse Photon, covering WildFly, Spring Boot, Camel, Maven, and many Java related improvements including full Java 10 support.

Developer Studio / JBoss Tools provides a desktop IDE with a broad set of tooling covering multiple programming models and frameworks. If you are doing container / cloud development, there is integrated functionality for working with Red Hat OpenShift, Kubernetes, Red Hat Container Development Kit, and Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes. For integration projects, there is tooling covering Camel and Red Hat Fuse that can be used in both local and cloud deployments.

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Announcing Developer Studio 11.3.0.GA, JBoss Tools 4.5.3 for Eclipse Oxygen.3a

Announcing Developer Studio 11.3.0.GA, JBoss Tools 4.5.3 for Eclipse Oxygen.3a

The community editions of JBoss Tools 4.5.3 and JBoss Developer Studio 11.3 for Eclipse Oxygen.3a are here waiting for you. Check it out!

Installation

JBoss Developer Studio comes with everything pre-bundled in its installer. Simply download it from our JBoss Products page and run it like this:

java -jar jboss-devstudio-<installername>.jar

JBoss Tools or Bring-Your-Own-Eclipse (BYOE) JBoss Developer Studio require a bit more:

This release requires at least Eclipse 4.7 (Oxygen) but we recommend using the latest Eclipse 4.7.3a Oxygen JEE Bundle since then you get most of the dependencies preinstalled.

Once you have installed Eclipse, you can either find us on the Eclipse Marketplace under “JBoss Tools” or “Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio”.

For JBoss Tools, you can also use our update site directly.

http://download.jboss.org/jbosstools/oxygen/stable/updates/

What is new?

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Deploying a Spring Boot App with MySQL on OpenShift

Deploying a Spring Boot App with MySQL on OpenShift

This article shows how to take an existing Spring Boot standalone project that uses MySQL and deploy it on Red Hat OpenShift,  In the process, we’ll create docker images which can be deployed to most container/cloud platforms. I’ll discuss creating a Dockerfile, pushing the container image to an OpenShift registry, and finally creating running pods with the Spring Boot app deployed.

To develop and test using OpenShift on my local machine, I used Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK), which provides a single-node OpenShift cluster running in a Red Hat Enterprise Linux VM, based on minishift. You can run CDK on top of Windows, macOS, or Red Hat Enterprise Linux.   For testing, I used Red Hat Enterprise Linux Workstation release 7.3. It should work on macOS too.

To create the Spring Boot app I used this article as a guide. I’m using an existing openshift/mysql-56-centos7 docker image to deploy MySQL to  OpenShift.

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Enabling Byteman Script with Red Hat JBoss Fuse and AMQ – Part1

In a production or customer environment it is not always possible to identify issues by looking at logs, nor is it always possible to setup remote debugging using an integrated development environment (IDE) and remote debug port. Often the issues are specific to the environment and can’t be reproduced. Having byteman scripts can help in these situations to identify issues without actual code changes. Whenever certain java class or logic is invoked, byteman scripts will also be invoked as per defined class and method in the byteman script.

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Red Hat Sessions at Devoxx 2017

Red Hat Sessions at Devoxx 2017

The 2017 edition of the legendary Devoxx conference is over, and as always, it has been a fantastic week.

Hosted in Antwerp, Belgium, and sold out months in advance, it’s one of the top events of the Java community. Five days fully packed with workshops, regular conference sessions, BOFs, ignite sessions and even quickie talks during the lunch breaks – there was something for everyone.

The super-comfortable cinema seats at the Devoxx venue are legendary, but also if you couldn’t attend, you wouldn’t miss a thing as the sessions were live streamed. But it gets even better: all the recordings are freely available on YouTube already.

Red Hat was present with more than ten speakers, so Devoxx was a great opportunity for us to show the latest projects. Our sessions covered the full range of software development, from presenting a new garbage collector, over Java coding patterns and updates on popular libraries such as Hibernate, up to several talks related to microservices, including how to test, secure and deploy them on Kubernetes and OpenShift.

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Upgrading to Vaadin Framework 8 (Part 2 of 2)

Upgrading to Vaadin Framework 8 (Part 2 of 2)

In the previous part of this blog, I talked about the most important steps to get your project to compile with the latest Framework version.

The migration has been done through the first three steps mentioned here, and in this post, I will go over the least complicated steps of migration. Steps 4 and 5 cover the modernization of your project with the latest Framework 8 features. If you are in a hurry, you can do this later on as well, and use the new APIs only for new Vaadin code.

  1. Upgrade dependencies in the POM file
  2. Run Maven goal vaadin:upgrade8
  3. Upgrade Add-ons
  4. Upgrade non-data components
  5. Upgrade data components
  6. Back to the future

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Infinispan’s Java 8 Streams Capabilities

Let’s be honest: it’s pretty exciting that Infinispan now supports Java 8 for many reasons, but perhaps one of the most anticipated reasons is because of the new stream classes. The main reason for this is the fact that it completely transforms the way we process data. Instead of having to iterate upon the data yourself, the underlying stream does this for you, and all you have to do is provide the operations to perform on it. This is perfect for distributed processing because the implementation handles the iteration entirely.

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