Integration

Integration of storage services (part 6)

Integration of storage services (part 6)

In Part 5 this series, we looked into details that determine how your integration becomes the key to transforming your customer experience.

It started with laying out the process of how I’ve approached the use case by researching successful customer portfolio solutions as the basis for a generic architectural blueprint. Now it’s time to cover various blueprint details.

This article covers the final elements in the blueprint, storage services, which are fundamental to the generic architectural overview.

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Integration of container platform essentials (Part 5)

Integration of container platform essentials (Part 5)

In Part 4 of this series, we looked into details that determine how your integration becomes the key to transforming your omnichannel customer experience.

It started with laying out the process of how I’ve approached the use case by researching successful customer portfolio solutions as the basis for a generic architectural blueprint. Now it’s time to cover more blueprint details.

This article discusses the core elements in the blueprint (container platform and microservices) that are crucial to the generic architectural overview.

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Integration of API management details (Part 4)

Integration of API management details (Part 4)

In Part 3 of this series, we started diving into the details that determine how your integration becomes the key to transforming your customer experience.

It started with laying out the process of how I’ve approached the use case by researching successful customer portfolio solutions as the basis for a generic architectural blueprint. Now it’s time to cover various blueprint details.

This article takes you deeper into specific elements (API management and reverse proxy) of the generic architectural overview.

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Integration of external application details (Part 3)

Integration of external application details (Part 3)

In Part 2 of this series, we took a high-level view of the common architectural elements that determine how your integration becomes the key to transforming your customer experience.

I laid out how I’ve approached the use case and how I’ve used successful customer portfolio solutions as the basis for researching a generic architectural blueprint. The only thing left to cover was the order in which you’ll be led through the blueprint details.

This article takes you deeper to cover details pertaining to the specific elements (mobile and web application deployments) of the generic architectural overview.

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How to integrate a remote Red Hat AMQ 7 cluster on Red Hat JBoss EAP 7

How to integrate a remote Red Hat AMQ 7 cluster on Red Hat JBoss EAP 7

It is very common in an integration landscape to have different components connected using a messaging system such as Red Hat AMQ 7 (RHAMQ 7). In this landscape, usually, there are JEE application servers, such as Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform 7 (JBoss EAP 7), to deploy and run applications connected to the messaging system.

This article describes in detail how to integrate a remote RHAMQ 7 cluster on a JBoss EAP 7 server, and it covers in detail the different configurations and components and some tips to improve your message-driven beans (MDBs) applications.

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Common architectural elements for modern integration architectures (Part 2)

Common architectural elements for modern integration architectures (Part 2)

In Part 1 of this series, we explored a use case around integration being the key to transforming your customer experience.

I laid out how I’ve approached the use case and how I’ve used successful customer portfolio solutions as the basis for researching a generic architectural blueprint. The only thing left to cover was the order in which you’ll be led through the blueprint details.

This article, which is Part 2 of the series, starts the real journey at the very top, with a generic architecture from which we’ll discuss the common architectural elements one by one.

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How integration is key to customer experience (Part 1)

How integration is key to customer experience (Part 1)

For the past few months, I’ve been digging into my new role with a group of Portfolio Architects, looking specifically at integration as the key to omnichannel customer experience.

It’s an interesting challenge in that we’ve been given the mission of creating architectural content based on common customer adoption patterns. That’s very different from most of the traditional marketing activities usually associated with generating content for the sole purpose of positioning products for solutions. When you’re basing the content on actual execution in solution delivery, you’re cutting out the chuff. 

What’s that mean?

It means that it’s going to provide you with a way to implement a solution using open source technologies by focusing on the integrations, structures, and interactions that actually have been proven to work.

What’s not included is any vendor promises that you’ll find in normal marketing content: those promises that, when it gets down to implementation crunch time, might not fully deliver.

Enter the term architectural blueprint. 

In this series of articles, let’s look at these blueprints, how they are created, and what value they provide for your solution designs.

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Auto-generating news and publishing it to WordPress with Apache Camel

Auto-generating news and publishing it to WordPress with Apache Camel

With the release of Apache Camel 2.21, some new components were added to the project and Camel WordPress was one of them. Camel is one of the upstream community projects for Red Hat Fuse. In this article, we will see how to use this new component to publish an auto-generated news post based on a soccer statistics API. The example consumes the statistics API, generates the text based on a Natural Language Generation (NLG) library and then publishes it to the WordPress blog.

WordPress is one of the most used open source tools for creating websites. More than 30% of the web is built on top of WordPress. Besides creating websites, blogs, and apps, WordPress leverages a huge plugin repository maintained by a passionate community. There are even plugins that can turn a WordPress website into an e-commerce platform.

Since version 4.7, WordPress exposes a REST API capable of interacting with its resources, for example, users, categories, pages, posts, and custom types. Now it’s possible for third parties to integrate with the WordPress platform and perform almost anything with their resources.

Some companies implement internal websites, blogs, and project sites using WordPress. Integrating such platforms with another company’s components—such as CRM, ERP, LDAP, and Calendar Services—would add extra value to WordPress-based projects. Camel WordPress can help integrate those components easily. To get started using this new component, nothing is better than a demo.

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Reducing data inconsistencies with Red Hat Process Automation Manager

Reducing data inconsistencies with Red Hat Process Automation Manager

Managing data reconciliation through a specific process is a common necessity for projects that require Digital Process Automation (formerly known as Business Process Management), and Red Hat Process Automation Manager helps to address such a requirement. This article provides good practices and a technique for satisfying data reconciliation in a structured and clean way.

Red Hat Process Automation Manager was formerly known as Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite, so it’s worth mentioning that jBPM is the upstream project that fuels Process Automation Manager. The blog post From BPM and business automation to digital automation platforms explains the reasons behind the new name and shares exciting news for this major release.

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Setting up RBAC on Red Hat AMQ Broker

Setting up RBAC on Red Hat AMQ Broker

One thing that is common in the enterprise world, especially in highly regulated industries, is to have separation of duties. Role-based access controls (RBAC) have built-in support for separation of duties. Roles determine what operations a user can and cannot perform. This post provides an example of how to configure proper RBAC on top of Red Hat AMQ, a flexible, high-performance messaging platform based on the open source Apache ActiveMQ Artemis project.

In most of the cases, separation of duties on Red Hat AMQ can be divided into three primary roles:

  1. Administrator role, which will have all permissions
  2. Application role, which will have permission to publish, consume, or produce messages to a specific address, subscribe to topics or queues, or create and delete addresses.
  3. Operation role, which will have read-only permission via the web console or supported protocols

To implement those roles, Red Hat AMQ has several security features that need be configured, as described in the following sections.

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