Flexible Images or Using S2I for Image Configuration

Container images usually come with pre-defined tools or services with minimal or limited possibilities of further configuration. This brought us into a way of thinking of how to provide images that contain reasonable default settings but are, at the same time, easy to extend. And to make it more fun, this would be possible to achieve both on a single Linux host and in an orchestrated OpenShift environment.

Source-to-image (S2I) has been introduced three years ago to allow developers to build containerized applications by simply providing source code as an input. So why couldn’t we use it to make configuration files as an input instead? We can, of course!

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Container Images for OpenShift – Part 4: Cloud readiness

This is a transcript of a session I gave at EMEA Red Hat Tech Exchange 2017, a gathering of all Red Hat solution architects and consultants across EMEA. It is about considerations and good practices when creating images that will run on OpenShift. This fourth and last part focuses on the specific aspects of cloud-ready applications and the consequences concerning the design of the container images.

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Container Images for OpenShift – Part 3: Making your images consumable

This is a transcript of a session I gave at EMEA Red Hat Tech Exchange 2017, a gathering of all Red Hat solution architects and consultants across EMEA. It is about considerations and good practices when creating images that will run on OpenShift. This third part focuses on how you can make your images easier to consume by application developers or release managers.

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Container Images for OpenShift – Part 2: Structuring your images

This is a transcript of a session I gave at EMEA Red Hat Tech Exchange 2017, a gathering of all Red Hat solution architects and consultants across EMEA. It is about considerations and good practices when creating images that will run on OpenShift. This second part focuses on how you should structure images and group of images to achieve the objectives stated in part one.

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Container Images for OpenShift – Part 1: Objectives

This is a transcript of a session I gave at EMEA Red Hat Tech Exchange 2017, a gathering of all Red Hat solution architects and consultants across EMEA. It is about considerations and good practices when creating images that will run on OpenShift. The content is structured in a series of four posts:

  • Objectives
  • Structuring your images
  • Making your images consumable
  • Cloud readiness

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Container Images Compliance – what we built at ManageIQ to remove a security pain point – part 2

Part 2 of 2

In part one of this blog post, we mentioned a pain point in Container based environments. We introduced SCAP as a means to measure compliance in computer systems and introduced ManageIQ as a means of automating Cloud & Container based workflows.

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Imagine this – the life of an image

Imagine this: deploy an application from code-commit to qa, validate through automated testing, and then push the same image into production with no manual intervention, no outage, no configuration changes, and with full audibility through change records. A month-and-a-half ago, we formed a tiger team and gave them less than 90 days to do it. How? Build an end-to-end CI/CD environment leveraging RHEL Atomic 7.1 as the core platform and integrating with key technologies like git, Jenkins, packer.io, in a hybrid deployment model and in accordance with our enterprise standards. Oh, and make sure we don’t care if we lose a couple of the nodes in the cluster when we’re running the application in production.

Disruptive technology that spawns disruptive business architecture. And it all starts with imagining the life of this thing called an image.

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