hybrid cloud

Red Hat technologies make open hybrid cloud a reality

Red Hat technologies make open hybrid cloud a reality

Lots of organizations worldwide have the goal of an open hybrid cloud. The ability to build applications that work with multiple public cloud providers as well as on-premise virtualization services without vendor lock-in has many advantages:

  • The ability to move workloads from one cloud provider to another.
  • The freedom to move workloads in-house and off-premises as needed.
  • The ability to coordinate tasks running in different clouds.

For a definition of open hybrid cloud, we turn to Red Hat’s Eric Schabell:

Hybrid cloud is a combination of one or more public and private clouds with at least a degree of workload portability, integration, orchestration, and unified management.

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Red Hat Summit 2019 Labs: Integration and APIs roadmap

Red Hat Summit 2019 Labs: Integration and APIs roadmap

Red Hat Summit 2019 is rocking Boston, MA from May 7-9 in the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center. Everything you need to know about the current state of open source enterprise-ready software can be found at this event. From customers talking about their experiences leveraging open source in their solutions, to the creators of open source technologies you’re using, and all the way down to hands-on lab experiences on these technologies.

This hands-on appeal is what this series of articles is about. Previously, we looked at the labs in the Cloud-Native App Dev track, and this time, we provide a roadmap to the “Integration and APIs” lab content.

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Red Hat Summit: Clouds today, serverless tomorrow

Red Hat Summit: Clouds today, serverless tomorrow

Have you ever thought to yourself, “Today’s world would be so much richer if we had 29 kinds of hummus?” Neither has Stephanos Bacon, Senior Director of Portfolio Strategy for Red Hat Application Platforms. His entertaining presentation moved from the options available to humans hungry for hummus to a discussion of the bewildering array of choices available to developers and architects. Although too many choices can be a bad thing1, it’s important to understand what choices are relevant today and that the relevance of those choices is always shifting.

There are several things that don’t change, however. Some of the concerns that have been with us since before the dawn of time2 include:

  • Making developers as productive as possible
  • Balancing productivity with governance and compliance
  • Delivering software predictably and in a timely manner
  • Making software as robust as possible
  • Prioritizing usability and accessibility

But beyond these goals, there are three factors that are always in flux:

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