HPC

Using eXpress Data Path (XDP) maps in RHEL 8 Beta: Part 2

Using eXpress Data Path (XDP) maps in RHEL 8 Beta: Part 2

Diving into XDP

In the first part of this series on XDP, I introduced XDP and discussed the simplest possible example. Let’s now try to do something less trivial, exploring some more-advanced eBPF features—maps—and some common pitfalls.

XDP is available in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta, which you can download and run now.

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Achieving high-performance, low-latency networking with XDP: Part I

Achieving high-performance, low-latency networking with XDP: Part I

XDP: From zero to 14 Mpps

In past years, the kernel community has been using different approaches in the quest for ever-increasing networking performance. While improvements have been measurable in several areas, a new wave of architecture-related security issues and related counter-measures has undone most of the gains, and purely in-kernel solutions for some packet-processing intensive workloads still lag behind the bypass solution, namely Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK), by almost an order of magnitude.

But the kernel community never sleeps (almost literally) and the holy grail of kernel-based networking performance has been found under the name of XDP: the eXpress Data Path. XDP is available in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Beta, which you can download and run now.

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Running HPC workloads across multiple architectures with Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Running HPC workloads across multiple architectures with Red Hat Enterprise Linux

In this article, I want to provide some background details about our recently developed demonstration video – “Running Game of Life across multiple architectures with Red Hat Enterprise Linux“.

This video shows the Game of Life running in a heterogeneous environment using three 64-bit hardware architectures: aarch64 (ARM v8-A), ppc64le (IBM Power little endian) and x86_64 (Intel Xeon). If you are not familiar with the rules of this cellular automaton, they are worth checking out via the reference above.

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