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Open Liberty 20.0.0.5 brings updates to EJB persistent timers coordination and failover across members

Open Liberty 20.0.0.5 brings updates to EJB persistent timers coordination and failover across members

In Open Liberty 20.0.0.5, you can now configure failover for Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) persistent timers, load Java Authentication and Authorization Service (JAAS) classes directly from the resource adapter, format your logs to JSON or dev, and specify which JSON fields to leave out of your logs. In this article, we will discuss each of these features and how to implement them.

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Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.1: Improved cloud tools bring more languages, better flow

Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.1: Improved cloud tools bring more languages, better flow

We are pleased to announce the release of Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.1. Based on Eclipse Che, its upstream project, CodeReady Workspaces is a Red Hat OpenShift-native developer environment enabling developer teams for cloud-native development.

CodeReady Workspaces 2.1 is available now on OpenShift 3.11 and OpenShift 4.3+.

This new version introduces:

  • Dashboard: A new onboarding flow.
  • Quarkus: A new workspace gets you started with Quarkus.
  • Languages: The addition of .NET Core 3.1, Java 11, and Camel DSL (Apache Camel K).
  • Other: Editor and AirGap improvements.

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Building Java 11 and Gradle containers for OpenShift

Building Java 11 and Gradle containers for OpenShift

How do YOU get your Java apps running in a cloud?

First you grab a cloud from the sky by, for example,  (1) Getting started with a free account on Red Hat OpenShift Online, or (2) locally on your laptop using Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) or upstream Minishift on Windows, macOS, and Linux, or (3) using oc cluster up (only on Linux), or (4) by obtaining a login from someone running Red Hat OpenShift on a public or on-premises cloud. Then, you download the oc CLI client tool probably for Windows (and put it on your PATH). Then you select the Copy Login Command from the menu in the upper right corner under your name in the OpenShift Console’s UI, and you use, for example, the oc status command.

Great—now you just need to containerize your Java app. You could, of course, start to write your own Dockerfile, pick an appropriate container base image (and discuss Red Hat Enterprise Linux versus CentOS versus Fedora versus Ubuntu versus Debian versus Alpine with your co-workers; and, especially if you’re in an enterprise environment, figure out how to have that supported in production), figure out appropriate JVM startup parameters for a container, add monitoring, and so.

But perhaps what you really wanted to do today is…well, just get your Java app running in a cloud!

Read on to find an easier way.

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