GraalVM

How I built a serverless blog search with Java, Quarkus, and AWS Lambda

How I built a serverless blog search with Java, Quarkus, and AWS Lambda

DevNation Tech Talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions plus code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about serverless blog search with Java, Quarkus, and AWS Lambda from Gunnar Morling and Burr Sutter.

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Mandrel: A community distribution of GraalVM for the Red Hat build of Quarkus

Mandrel: A community distribution of GraalVM for the Red Hat build of Quarkus

The Java community has demonstrated time and time again its ability to evolve, improve, and adapt to meet the needs of its developers and users. Even after 25 years of language and framework choices, Java has consistently ranked in the top languages in use today due to its strong track record and capabilities in enterprise use cases. Red Hat has long been a strong leader in Java and open source software development and remains committed to being at the forefront of Java as it continues to evolve.

Today, Red Hat and the GraalVM community jointly established a new downstream distribution of GraalVM, called Mandrel. This distribution will power the Red Hat build of Quarkus, a recently announced addition to Red Hat Runtimes. This article explains what Mandrel is and why it is necessary.

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Migrating a Spring Boot microservices application to Quarkus

Migrating a Spring Boot microservices application to Quarkus

While Spring Boot has long been the de-facto framework for developing container-based applications in Java, the performance benefits of a Kubernetes-native framework are hard to ignore. In this article, I will show you how to quickly migrate a Spring Boot microservices application to Quarkus. Once the migration is complete, we’ll test the application and compare startup times between the original Spring Boot application and the new Quarkus app.

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Quarking Drools: How we turned a 13-year-old Java project into a first-class serverless component

Quarking Drools: How we turned a 13-year-old Java project into a first-class serverless component

“The question of whether a computer can think is no more interesting than the question of whether a submarine can swim.” (Edsger W. Dijkstra)

Rule-based artificial intelligence (AI) is often overlooked, possibly because people think it’s only useful in heavyweight enterprise software products. However, that’s not necessarily true. Simply put, a rule engine is just a piece of software that allows you to separate domain and business-specific constraint from the main application flow. We are part of the team developing and maintaining Drools—the world’s most popular open source rule engine and part of Red Hat—and, in this article, we will describe how we are changing Drools to make it part of the cloud and serverless revolution.

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Introducing Quarkus: a next-generation Kubernetes native Java framework

Introducing Quarkus: a next-generation Kubernetes native Java framework

Java was introduced to the open-source community more than 20 years ago and it still remains popular among developers. In fact, Java has never ranked lower than #2 on the TIOBE Index. Java was born in the mid-1990s and has nearly 20 years of optimizations for running highly dynamic monolithic applications that assumed sole ownership of (virtualized) host CPU and memory. However, we now live in a world dominated by the cloud, mobile, IoT, and open source, where containers, Kubernetes, microservices, reactive, Function-as-a-Service (FaaS), 12-factor, and cloud-native application development can deliver higher levels of productivity and efficiency. As an industry, we need to rethink how Java can be best utilized to address these new deployment environments and application architectures.

We’d like to introduce you to Quarkus and Supersonic Subatomic Java!

Quarkus is a Kubernetes Native Java framework tailored for GraalVM and HotSpot, crafted from best-of-breed Java libraries and standards. The goal of Quarkus is to make Java a leading platform in Kubernetes and serverless environments while offering developers a unified reactive and imperative programming model to optimally address a wider range of distributed application architectures.

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Natively compile Java code for better startup time

Natively compile Java code for better startup time

Microservices and serverless architectures are being implemented, or are a part of the roadmap, in most modern solution stacks. Given that Java is still the dominant language for business applications, the need for reducing the startup time for Java is becoming more important. Serverless architectures are one such area that needs faster startup times, and applications hosted on container platforms such as Red Hat Openshift can benefit from both fast Java startup time and a smaller Docker image size.

Let’s see how GraalVM can be beneficial for Java-based programs in terms of speed and size improvements. Surely, these gains are not bound to containers or serverless architectures and can be applied to a variety of use cases.

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