Running CDK 3.0 on Fedora 25

Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) provides a Container Development Environment (CDE) that allows users to build a virtualized environment for OpenShift. This environment is similar to the user’s production environment and does not need other hardware or a physical cluster. CDK is designed to work on a single user’s desktop computer.

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Basics of Go in Fedora

Why use RPMs (distribution packages in general) at all ?!

Distribution RPMs enables you to get signed curated content, with security updates, bug fixes, general updates, some level of testing, and known ways of reproducing the build locally. Of course, it has its cost mostly in the package size overhead and packaging infrastructure overhead (yum, dnf, apt….).

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Installing Red Hat Container Development Kit on Fedora

Fedora users seeking help on installing Container Development Kit (CDK), here is how you can install CDK 2.2 on your Fedora 24. These same steps can be used for CDK 2.3 too.

CDK provides a container development environment, to build production-grade applications, for use on OpenShift.

The installation of CDK 2.2 on Fedora essentially involves the following stages:

Setting up your virtualization environment
You need to first install the virtualization software, in this case, KVM/libvirt, and then proceed to install Vagrant and its additional plugins to enable the various features of CDK.

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Smart light with Arduino in Fedora / RHEL

The Internet of Things is a very new “thing” to us, but when we think of it, we’ve had access to the internet for a long period of time. We use “things” in day to day life that have been making our life easier for as long as we can remember.

Let’s take a common light bulb as an example. It consumes energy and produces light, which helps us everyday. Technology improvements have stripped down the consumption of resources to a bare minimum, while at the same time optimizing the output; efficiency and function has gone up. We even have internet connected and controllable light bulbs that change colors, operate on timers, and cooperate via mesh networks.

We live in an era where the mobile and telecommunications industries are booming, and the speed of internet would have been un-imaginable just one decade years before. Hence, the idea of making things smarter by connecting them to the internet, analyzing  petabytes of historical and real-time data, and automating their operation becomes more and more a reality. This will result in a smarter way of living, since IoT affects almost all the major areas of the industry: Agriculture, Healthcare, Home Automation, and many more.

This post is a proof of concept of how easy it is to smartly control lights on an Arduino without ethernet shield, but rather over HTTP. The idea is to let you control a single light or series of lights in your house with just a tap of an application (with a proper internet connection of course.)

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Fedora “update testing” with Bodhi

Before and after Fedora releases, there are updates that keep coming in to fix bugs or add minor features to packages included in Fedora. To ensure that these are stable and don’t affect the performance of the existing system, we do “update testing”. Once testing is complete, we share our results and make sure that the developer is aware about the bugs and the success rate of the package. This article will explain how to participate in update testing and contribute to a high quality Fedora release!

(Editor’s note: Fedora is the upstream project for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), which is now free for development use.)

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Getting Started with Release Validation Testing in Fedora QA

Release validation testing is a process which takes place before the official Fedora release. (Fedora is the upstream, community project from which RHEL is built.) Before the Final (GA) release, we have Alpha and Beta pre-releases and at each of these milestones, nightly builds (nightlies) and composes are released and tested to ensure that the release meets quality standards. Release validation testing is one way you can help Fedora get better, and this post will talk about how you can start off from scratch.

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