failover

Open Liberty 20.0.0.5 brings updates to EJB persistent timers coordination and failover across members

Open Liberty 20.0.0.5 brings updates to EJB persistent timers coordination and failover across members

In Open Liberty 20.0.0.5, you can now configure failover for Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) persistent timers, load Java Authentication and Authorization Service (JAAS) classes directly from the resource adapter, format your logs to JSON or dev, and specify which JSON fields to leave out of your logs. In this article, we will discuss each of these features and how to implement them.

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Setting Up a Failover Scenario Using Apache Camel ZooKeeper

Setting Up a Failover Scenario Using Apache Camel ZooKeeper

In this article, we will discuss using the Apache Camel ZooKeeper component, and demonstrate how easily we can set up a fail-over scenario for Apache Camel Routes. While working in a clustered environment, situations arise where a user wants to have a backup or slave route which will become active only when the master (or the currently active) route stops working. There are different ways to achieve this: one can use Quartz to configure a master-slave setup; JGroups can also be used. In a Fabric8 environment, there is a master component which can easily be set up as a failover scenario.

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Demonstrating Red Hat JBoss AMQ 7 HA Replication Failover

Demonstrating Red Hat JBoss AMQ 7 HA Replication Failover

A few weeks ago, the newest version of Red Hat JBoss AMQ was released. AMQ 7 is the result of Red Hat’s efforts on creating a unified messaging platform for its middleware offerings. One of the most interesting features of this new version is the new backing strategy for failovering when configured in high availability. This feature allows clients connections to migrate from one server to another in the event of server failure so client applications can continue to operate.

AMQ 6.x already had an option to configure failover using a shared store, usually backed up by a shared filesystem or a JDBC connection to a database. However, that option involved the use of external infrastructure add-on in hardware and software, representing an increase in overall deployment costs.

In AMQ 7, support for network-based replication was added. When using replication, the live and the backup servers do not share the same data directories; all data synchronization is done over the network. Therefore, all (persistent) data received by the live server will be duplicated to the backup.

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