fabric8

Deploy your Java web application into the cloud using Eclipse JKube

Deploy your Java web application into the cloud using Eclipse JKube

Before we had Spring Boot and similar frameworks, a web app container was the main requirement for deploying Java web applications. We now live in the age of microservices, and many Java applications are developed on top of Quarkus, Thorntail, or Spring Boot. But some use cases still require an old-school web application.

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How the fabric8 Maven plug-in deploys Java applications to OpenShift

How the fabric8 Maven plug-in deploys Java applications to OpenShift

The fabric8 Maven plug-in, often abbreviated FMP, can be added to a Maven Java project and takes care of the administrative tasks involved in deploying the application to a Red Hat OpenShift cluster. These tasks include:

  1. Creating an OpenShift build configuration (BC).
  2. Coordinating the source-to-image (S2I) process to create a container image from the application’s compiled bytecode.
  3. Creating and instantiating a deployment configuration (DC) from information in the project.
  4. Defining and instantiating OpenShift services and routes.

All of the relevant components of this process are well-documented individually. This article pulls together documentation sources to create an overview of how the plug-in works, and the structure of the image it generates—which might make the plug-in easier to use and troubleshoot.

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Getting started with the fabric8 Kubernetes Java client

Getting started with the fabric8 Kubernetes Java client

Fabric8 has been available as a Java client for Kubernetes since 2015, and today is one of the most popular client libraries for Kubernetes. (The most popular is client-go, which is the client library for the Go programming language on Kubernetes.) In recent years, fabric8 has evolved from a Java client for the Kubernetes REST API to a full-fledged alternative to the kubectl command-line tool for Java-based development.

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Introduction to Eclipse JKube: Java tooling for Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift

Introduction to Eclipse JKube: Java tooling for Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift

We as Java developers are often busy working on our applications by optimizing application memory, speed, etc. In recent years, encapsulating our applications into lightweight, independent units called containers has become quite a trend, and almost every enterprise is trying to shift its infrastructure onto container technologies like Docker and Kubernetes.

Kubernetes is an open source system for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications, but it has a steep learning curve, and an application developer with no background in DevOps can find this system a bit overwhelming. In this article, I will talk about tools that can help when deploying your Maven applications to Kubernetes/Red Hat OpenShift.

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Spring Boot and OAuth2 with Keycloak

Spring Boot and OAuth2 with Keycloak

The tutorial Spring Boot and OAuth2 showed how to enable OAuth2 with Spring Boot with Facebook as AuthProvider; this blog is the extension of showing how to use KeyCloak as AuthProvider instead of Facebook. I intend to keep this example as close to the original Spring Boot and OAuth2 and will explain the changes to the configuration to make the same application work with KeyCloak. The source code for the examples are available in the github repositories listed below.

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Securing Fuse 6.3 Fabric Cluster Management Console with SSL/TLS

Introduction

Enabling SSL/TLS in a Fabric is slightly more complex than securing a jetty in a standalone Karaf container. In the following article, we are providing feedback on the overall process. For clarity and simplification, the article will be divided into two parts.

 

Part1: The Management Console

Part2: Securing Web Service:including gateway-http

 

For the purpose of this PoC, the following environment will be used.

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Using Jenkins in the Red Hat CI/CD Ecosystem

Using Jenkins in the Red Hat CI/CD Ecosystem

The last 4-5 years have seen the debut of many new software products specifically targeting both infrastructure services and IT automation. The consumerization of IT has caused its architects to take a fresh look at their existing, often times monolithic apps and IT infrastructure and asking: Can we do better? How do I keep IT relevant? How do I keep track of all these VMs and data? How do I scale out my IT environment without a huge budget increase or physical buildout? How do I develop and get bits to production faster and with higher quality?

These organizations are looking to evolve their development and deployment processes to be more agile and accelerate time-to-market. They are trying to embrace things like DevOps and Continuous Deployment to do that. They are breaking monolithic apps out into microservices that can be independently updated, with a focus on speed and agility, so their apps can be more reactive to changes in their business. They are evolving from traditional virtualization to public and private cloud deployments.

There are strong parallels between the way open source communities produce great software and how IT orgs build and deliver great software and services. Red Hat, a recognized pioneer in open source, is using its deep experience in open source to build products that support microservice-oriented, DevOps-embracing, container and cloud-centric IT shops.

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DevNation Live Blog: fabric8-ing Continous Improvement with Kubernetes and Jenkins Pipeline

I’m sure you have heard and read a lot about microservices in the recent past  and how they are here to defend our end users from the horrible monolith. Breaking an application up into many components is a great start, but to take your organization to the next level requires a platform focused on integrating microservices into your continuous improvement process. Red Hat’s James Rawlings & James Strachan led us through achieving our new goal of continuous delivery with containerized microservices. The way to go fast while developing is ensuring that all microservices have their own release cycle. Splitting your team up to align with your microservices will allow faster changes, the ultimate goal. In order to take advantage of many rapid releases your deployment and testing processes must be automated. Automating your build process and creating continuous feedback loops is the way to go.

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