enterprise architecture

Distributed microservices architecture: Istio, managed API gateways and, enterprise integration

Distributed microservices architecture: Istio, managed API gateways and, enterprise integration

The rise of microservices architectures drastically changed the software development landscape. In the past few years, we have seen a shift from centralized monoliths to distributed computing that benefits from cloud infrastructure. With distributed deployments, the adoption of microservices, and system scaling to cloud levels, new problems emerged, as well as new components that tried to solve the problems.

By now, you most likely have heard that the service mesh or Istio is here to save the day. However, you might be wondering how it fits with your current enterprise integration investments and API management initiatives. That is what I discuss in this article.

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Patterns for distributed transactions within a microservices architecture

Patterns for distributed transactions within a microservices architecture

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Microservices architecture (MSA) has become very popular.. However, one common problem is how to manage distributed transactions across multiple microservices. This post is going to share my experience from past projects and explain the problem and possible patterns that could solve it.

What is a distributed transaction?

When a microservice architecture decomposes a monolithic system into self-encapsulated services, it can break transactions. This means a local transaction in the monolithic system is now distributed into multiple services that will be called in a sequence.

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Red Hat Summit: Lowering the risk of monolith to microservices

Red Hat Summit: Lowering the risk of monolith to microservices

Christian Posta, Chief Architect at Red Hat, presented the story of a fictitious company1 moving a monolithic application to microservices.

When considering risk, we think we know the bad things that can happen and the probabilities of those bad things actually happening. Christian defines a monolith as a large application developed over many years by different teams that delivers proven business value while being very difficult to update and maintain. Its architecture, elegant at one point, has eroded over time. That makes it difficult to assess the risk of migrating a monolith.

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