.NET Core Magic: Develop on one OS, run on another

I recently attempted to write a blog post about Angular and .NET Core 2.0 [Note: It will be posted as soon as the .NET Core 2.0 RPMs are released], using my Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) VM as the operating system. Even though the .NET Core 2.0 bits are not available yet from Red Hat, I gave it a shot by using a daily build. When I tried to run the code, however, I got an error related to the Roslyn compiler. Sometimes, when you play with fire — i.e. a daily build — you get burned.

And that’s when the creative juices, combined with the knowledge of .NET Core’s Self-contained deployment technology (you might also see it referred to as a “Standalone app”) came to the rescue.

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From Java to .NET Core, Part 2: Types

In my previous post in the series, I discussed some fairly surface-level differences between C#/.NET and Java. These can be important for Java developers transitioning to .NET Core, to create code that looks and feels “native” to the new ecosystem. In this post, we dig beneath the surface, to understand .NET’s type system. It is my belief that, with Java in the rear view mirror, the .NET type system is more effective and enjoyable to write on. But you be the judge.

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Technical How-to Books for Developers – Microservices, Design Patterns, .NET, Reactive, Databases

Within Red Hat knowledge sharing and collaboration are important.  As a part of that many Red Hatters write books and we get the honor of sharing their knowledge with other developers.  We have 7 more books in queue for the coming year and thought we would share the books you can currently download.

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From Java to .NET Core. Part 1

There was a time when the word “.NET” was virtually synonymous with bloat, vendor lock-in, and Windows. .NET Core is the exact opposite. It’s blazingly fast. It’s open source under a permissive license (Mostly MIT, some parts Apache-2.0). Unlike some other open-source platforms, .NET Core’s Contributor License Agreement does not grant exclusive privileges to a single corporation. .NET Core is cross-platform, allowing you to target Windows, Mac, Docker, and many flavors of Linux. My favorite resource for getting started with .NET core is Don Schenck’s free book. This post, I hope, can serve as an addendum specifically for Java developers exploring .NET’s flagship language, C#. While C# borrows much from Java, there are important differences to be aware of. Fortunately, some of them are for the better. In this series of posts, I’ll go over a few of the most prominent differences.

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O’Reilly Authors are Heading to Summit – microservices, raspberry pi hacks, .NET and more.

Red Hat Summit is just around the corner in Boston and we are preparing just a few of the many Red Hat authors for their book signings.  We’ve given them 6 steps to signing books:

  • Step 1: Get books ordered.
  • Step 2: Get to Boston.
  • Step 3: Bring a marker.
  • Step 4: Bring a spare marker.
  • Step 5: Show up at the right time.
  • Step 6: Enjoy sharing your work with attendees!

Continue reading “O’Reilly Authors are Heading to Summit – microservices, raspberry pi hacks, .NET and more.”

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