Red Hat Releases .NET Core 2.0

As a follow-up to yesterday’s press release, I am pleased to announce the immediate availability of and support for .NET Core 2.0, the latest version of the open source .NET Core project, on Red Hat’s portfolio of open technologies. A lightweight and modular platform for creating web applications and microservices, .NET Core 2.0 provides significant new developer capabilities while enabling developers to create .NET applications across platforms, and deploy on Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, and more.

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Advanced Microservices with .NET

During Red Hat Summit, this past May I along with Scott Hunter from Microsoft took part in a session titled Microservices and OpenShift with .NET Core and .NET Standard 2.0.  I went first and talked about building microservices.

This was an overview demonstrating the evolution through running a program at a command line, a .NET Core program in RHEL. Once completed I then showed just how easy it was to take the image and put into OpenShift and scale it up and down by running it through Docker.

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.NET Core Magic: Develop on one OS, run on another

I recently attempted to write a blog post about Angular and .NET Core 2.0 [Note: It will be posted as soon as the .NET Core 2.0 RPMs are released], using my Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) VM as the operating system. Even though the .NET Core 2.0 bits are not available yet from Red Hat, I gave it a shot by using a daily build. When I tried to run the code, however, I got an error related to the Roslyn compiler. Sometimes, when you play with fire — i.e. a daily build — you get burned.

And that’s when the creative juices, combined with the knowledge of .NET Core’s Self-contained deployment technology (you might also see it referred to as a “Standalone app”) came to the rescue.

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From Java to .NET Core, Part 2: Types

In my previous post in the series, I discussed some fairly surface-level differences between C#/.NET and Java. These can be important for Java developers transitioning to .NET Core, to create code that looks and feels “native” to the new ecosystem. In this post, we dig beneath the surface, to understand .NET’s type system. It is my belief that, with Java in the rear view mirror, the .NET type system is more effective and enjoyable to write on. But you be the judge.

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