domain-driven design

DesOps is “DevOps 2.0”

DesOps is “DevOps 2.0”

As we discussed in the last post, most of DevOps today focuses on the process blocks that mostly impact engineering or technical aspects of a product rather than the design aspect. Even though  DesOps was primarily born out of the primary need of how to design at scale, the factors that shaped it are of a similar nature to the factors that shaped DevOps.

With recent software delivery processes, for example, the Agile process and Continuous Integration (CI) and Continuous Deployment (CD)of code, the DevOps approach provided a faster highway to ensure faster delivery with low risks. So the earlier SDLC model got redefined over time with Agile and then with DevOps to its current shape.

However, because design is an integral part of any product delivered, there is a need to ensure that gaps are bridged between the traditional design lifecycle and the fast track of the DevOps development lifecycle. DesOps and DevOps both are complementary to each other. The design delivery process improvements try to optimize the overall delivery process and thereby contribute to DevOps, for example, in aspects such as testing of the product that involves design aspects, usability, accessibility, etc.

The need for tighter integration between the design team and the engineering team became a necessity to ensure to design at scale. During the past two to three years, the top five big companies have made heavy investments in this area that have paved the way for other organizations and design communities to be more explorative in this area.

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Red Hat Summit: An Eventful Tour from Enterprise Integration to Serverless

Red Hat Summit: An Eventful Tour from Enterprise Integration to Serverless

Red Hat Senior Architects Marius Bogoevici and Christian Posta recently presented an overview of event-driven architecture, taking the audience from the basics of enterprise integration to microservices and serverless computing. Standing in front of a packed room at Red Hat Summit, their talk addressed four basic points:

  1. Event-driven architectures have been around for a while. What are they, why are they powerful, and why are back en vogue?
  2. Messaging is often used as a backbone for event-based distributed systems. What options do we have for cloud-native event-driven architectures?
  3. Integration is necessary for any organization. How do streaming, cloud-native architectures, and microservices fit in?
  4. Are Functions-as-a-Service (FaaS) the next utopian architecture? Where do functions fit in a world of microservices?

The entire session was done with three enterprise concerns in mind. First is the divide between agile systems and purpose-built systems. While the purpose-built system is optimized for a small set of use cases, it is very difficult to change if new use cases arise or the old use cases become irrelevant. We have to be agile to adapt to a constantly changing environment. Another concern is resource utilization. We want to eliminate waste and get the most out of our systems and resources, although the cloud in general and containers in particular make more distributed architectures practical. Finally, Christian made the observation that we cannot build complex systems from complex parts. The components we develop must be as simple and understandable as possible.

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