development environment

Develop and test a Quarkus client on Red Hat CodeReady Containers with Red Hat Data Grid 8.0

Develop and test a Quarkus client on Red Hat CodeReady Containers with Red Hat Data Grid 8.0

This article is about my experience installing Red Hat Data Grid (RHDG) on Red Hat CodeReady Containers (CRC) so that I could set up a local environment to develop and test a Quarkus Infinispan client. I started by installing CodeReady Containers and then installed Red Hat Data Grid. I am also on a learning path for Quarkus, so my last step was to integrate the Quarkus Infinispan client into my new development environment.

Initially, I tried connecting the Quarkus client to my locally running instance of Data Grid. Later, I decided I wanted to create an environment where I could test and debug Data Grid on Red Hat OpenShift 4. I tried installing Data Grid on OpenShift 4 in a shared environment, but maintaining that environment was challenging. Through trial-and-error, I found that it was better to install Red Hat Data Grid on CodeReady Containers and use that for my local development and testing environment.

In this quick tutorial, I guide you through setting up a local environment to develop and test a Quarkus client—in this case, Quarkus Infinispan. The process consists of three steps:

  1. Install and run CodeReady Containers.
  2. Install Data Grid on CodeReady Containers.
  3. Integrate the Quarkus Infinispan client into the new development environment.

Continue reading “Develop and test a Quarkus client on Red Hat CodeReady Containers with Red Hat Data Grid 8.0”

Share
Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 2

Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 2

This is the second half of my series covering how to use Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces to develop a Java Enterprise Edition (now Jakarta EE) application using Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP) in the cloud on Red Hat OpenShift/Kubernetes. In the first part, we saw how to:

  • Bring your own tools by extending Red Hat’s provided stacks
  • Register your own stack within Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces
  • Create your workspace using your stack and embedding your JEE project located on a Git repository

For this second part, we’ll start configuring the workspace by adding some helpful settings and commands for building and running a JBoss EAP project. We’ll then see how to use the local JBoss EAP instance for deploying and debugging our application. Finally, we’ll create a factory so that we’ll be able to share our work and propose an on-demand configured development environment for anyone that needs to collaborate on our project.

Continue reading “Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 2”

Share
Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 1

Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 1

It has been just one month since the announcement of the release of Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 1.0.0 Beta. Because the cloud/browser-based IDE may be full of promises, developers are usually suspicious, considering them as toys for occasional coders but not suitable for software craftsmen. But you’ll quickly see that Red Hat’s offering can be a good companion for building tailor-made environments.

The goal of this two-part series is to give a walk-through of using Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces to develop a Java EE (now Jakarta EE) application using Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP). I’ll give you details on how to bring your own tools, configure your workspace with helpful commands for JBoss EAP, and share everything so you can easily onboard new developers.

Continue reading “Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 1”

Share
Five OpenShift Development Environments in Five Minutes

Five OpenShift Development Environments in Five Minutes

It’s been over a month since I spoke at the Red Hat Summit in Boston and now that the dust has settled, I thought you might be interested in reading a brief summary of my Lightning Talk on Five OpenShift Development Environments in Five Minutes.

In the presentation, I spoke about five different ways that you can create an OpenShift development environment within minutes. This included oc cluster up, Vagrant All in One Box, Minishift, a Fabric8 technology, and the Red Hat Development Suite. My goal through the presentation was to get developers up and working with OpenShift very quickly.

Continue reading “Five OpenShift Development Environments in Five Minutes”

Share